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Monthly Archives: June 2012

Author Spotlight no.98 – Carrie King

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the ninety-eighth, is of children’s author and illustrator Carrie King.

Carrie King was born in the tiny Hamlet of Sharpenhoe in Bedfordshire, England, which sits beneath a small hill, smothered in trees, known as The Clappers, nestled on the edge of the Chilterns. To any Reader of The Life in the Wood with Joni-Pip, that might sound a tad familiar!

She was the seventh of eight children, placed between her youngest brother, David and her youngest but older sister, Sylvia. When she was eight, her family moved to another tiny Hamlet in Bedfordshire called Bidwell. She so missed the woods and the hills.

Carrie was educated in Dunstable, Bedfordshire and loved school. English, Art and French were her favourite subjects but she decided to become a doctor! However, this didn’t happen, as she fell in love and was married at nineteen. Being a wife and the mother of three daughters, became her full-time career.

She began to write for television, encouraged by Christopher Walker, Head of Drama for Central Television and Pam Francis, Journalist for the Independent.

The Writing of The Life in the Wood with Joni-Pip for her Great Niece, Joni Philipa, began in November 1997 while staying in a villa at Center Parcs, Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire. Joni Philipa was three years old at the time and she was called Joni-Pip, by her parents Philip and Sarah.

Carrie started to draw her illustrations for The Life in the Wood with Joni-Pip, whilst staying at Center Parcs. She stayed there many times with her family, and each villa she stayed in provided her with yet another picturesque woodland scene.

Sadly in April 2000, writing was interrupted for a few years by the tragic death of Carrie’s husband in an accident.

The novel began as a story for little children but books take a long time to be written, printed and bound and Joni-Pip grew much quicker than the story. What began as a simple Child’s Tale evolved into an adventure for much older children, which adults have enjoyed too.

The Life in the Wood with Joni-Pip was finally finished in December 2007, over ten years after it was started!

And now from the author herself:

“Miss Carrie, that imagination of yours will surely get you into serious trouble one day!”

Thus came the damning declaration from my Nanny, or was it a foresighted prophecy? I was eight-years-old. What prompted such a censure from my parents’ hired Governess?

T’was most perplexing: every time I was caught red-handed (literally), in certain compromising situations: writing in big red letters on The Nursery wall or dressing up, plastering my apple shaped face in Mother’s lipstick, bedecked in her expensive ‘forbidden’ jewellery, I would instantly come up with the most fantastic and very logical reasons why I simply had to be doing such things.

“Nanny Pam,” I would earnestly remonstrate, “I must use the wall, otherwise we’ll have to cut down trees in the garden to make paper!”

Or….

“Nanny Pam, I’m off to The Ball! I can hardly wear plastic popper beads, what shame that would bring on the Family name.”

The problem was, Morgen, I truly believed these yarns I spun (brilliant pun, I congratulate the creator), when in truth, they were nothing short of lies.

Therein lies (my pun this time), the secret of the fantasy writer: we are all compulsive liars, shrouded in the delightful term, ‘imaginative’: even the word conjures up magic!

Take Joni-Pip for example: as in my favourite book, The Wind in the Willows, animals and also, as in my case, toys, talk. We all know that they don’t really converse, so that is a complete falsehood. My parents often found me embroiled in deep discussion and debate with my teds and dolls and to this day, I still do it in writing.  So real to me are the characters I create in words that I truly believe them to exist. Take Ethelred-Ted for example; he is Joni-Pip’s much beloved favourite toy, always a listener, always understanding of her point of view….until he comes alive. How shocked she is when he proves to be this talkative, very pompous and yet totally loyal, know-it-all. So authentic is he that once, in my Editor-in-chief’s office, I erupted into unbridled laughter on reading a couple of Ethelred-Ted’s lines (see, real characters). My Editor was puzzled.

“Listen to Eth,” I enthused, “he’s such a hoot. When Jack reminds him we are all only made of dust, Eth replies, ‘That blows me away!’ ”

I then continued, crimped in giggles.

Morgen, it didn’t occur to me that I was the maker of the mirth that had so enraptured me. So good are we fantasy writers at lying that we even fool ourselves!

Recently an African asked me if I was a ‘Liar’. I laughed and said I thought that was rather a personal question. He asked again,

“Are you a Liar?”

Uncomfortably, I laughed again.

“You look like a Liar,” he said seriously, “will you represent me in Court?”

African accents!

What it did make me think though, is that Lawyers might make brilliant fantasy writers or perhaps, I should say, fantasy writers might make brilliant Lawyers.

And read your own contracts. 🙂 Thank you, Carrie.

You can find more about Carrie and her writing via… www.joni-pip.com.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with children’s author, poet, article writer and blogger Helen Ross – the four hundred and seventeenth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

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Flash Fiction Friday 41: Portraits of a young artist in Istanbul by Gene Parola

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the forty-first piece of flash fiction in this series. This week’s is a 626-worder by short story author and novelist Gene Parola.

Portraits of a young artist in Istanbul

Book I

The square paving stones had been laid in successive arcs across the entire expanse around the steps to Taksim Park when the new Metro station was completed.  This broad space, clear of  the bus boarding queues, shone white in the warm spring sun.

The stark contrast of the crimson pool set against the rigid repetition of the squares caused her to think again about the graphic impact that a single brilliant color made on a blank background.  As she sank to one knee, her artist’s eye searched for a balance between the changing relationship of the background squares and the circular pool.

But, by then the composition had shifted radically.  The oval of the pool had been crowded into the top left corner of her field of vision and each stone on the gradual slope below, now bordered in the red, asserted its individuality and sprang from the background.

“A study in red and square, I’d call it,” she said, her head bowing nearer the composition.  “If I had time.”

The composition changed even more radically now, the green triangle of her mini-skirt cut diagonally across the bottom of the grid.  But her changed point of view was distorting everything.  With her eye on the level of the stones, the squares became parallelograms. Very distorted ones, while her left eye was still open–not so much when viewed with only the right.

“When I had time.”

She raised her head for another look, but the left eye wouldn’t open again and the monocular vision only flattened the composition further.

As her dark fashionably short hair sank again into the already sticky pool,  “Another time,” she whispered.

“Whore!” he spat, shaking the bloodied Koran before her one good eye.

“In another life, maybe.  If I have time.”  She smiled at him. And the eye closed.

Book II

God, she was so beautiful!  But the wanton display of her legs in the black tights! The short skirt. Her hair!

The scripture was so right to point out how they rouse a man.  How they inflame him to passion. To sin. To destruction. My own member swells at the memory of her striding across our garden, the wind blowing her hair.  Pressing the blouse to her breasts.  Images no man should have to confront!  He should not have to pray in mosque for strength to fight such evil urges.

But you see–that’s what happens.  That’s what causes it all.

If she had only been willing to cover her hair and wear longer skirts, then they would have had nothing to say.  Oh, Ashia hanim--but she always has something to say.  And Mehmet!  The hypocrite!

She could be an artist.  She could go to the academy.  She could read and argue the heresies with me.  I am not an ignorant peasant like my neighbors.  She could do all this.

She was so smart.

She told me how she rebuffed the men who would despoil her.  She told me how she argued with the other girls about the value of her virginity.

She was so stubborn, so proud.

I was proud of her too.

If she could have been more… careful.

The way they stared at her in the morning when she walked to catch the dolmus!  The things they said so my wife would hear!

But it’s taken care of now.  I did it there in Taksim Square where all could see and hear.  Ashia and Mehmet and all the others–they will have to gossip of something else now.

Her mother will stop crying soon….

Who would have thought that the young girl would have so much blood?

And the way it gushed from the wound.  Was such energy a last gesture of rebellion?

It squirted all over my Koran.

***

Wow. Thank you Gene.

Mr Gene Parola is a retired Professor of cultural history at Indiana University and University of Michigan-Flint; the Ministry of Defense, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Koç University in Istanbul Turkey. As a former Naval Air Intelligence officer and a career researcher, he has trained himself to be a keen observer of his surroundings and has acquired a large cultural and social context into which those observations fit.

He is a freelance writer of Business (See Honolulu Star Bulletin, July 28, 2002) and Technical (Hurricane Handbook, Sail Net News, Spring, 2003) articles. His short stories have been published in Voices from the Universe and in Bamboo Ridge Press, 25th Anniversary Edition. And the Spring 2006 edition.

Mr. Parola speaks frequently to lodges, clubs and service organizations on a variety of topics.

If you’d like to submit your 1,000-word max. stories for consideration for Flash Fiction Friday take a look here.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with poet and memoirist Maggie Harris – the four hundred and sixteenth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2012 in ebooks, short stories, writing

 

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Guest post: Should You Judge a Book by its Cover? by Nina Munteanu

Tonight’s guest blog post, on the topic of book covers is brought to you by science fiction and fantasy author, short story and article writer, blogger and teacher Nina Munteanu.

Should You Judge a Book by its Cover?

Most readers—me included—will pick a book off the bookstore shelf because its cover interests us: the title intrigues; the cover illustration attracts; the author’s name is one we trust.

If you don’t know the author of the book, the nature—and implied promise—of the cover becomes even more important.

If the book does not deliver on the promise of the cover, it will fail with many readers despite its intrinsic value. A broken promise is still a broken promise. I say cover, not necessarily the back jacket blurb, because the front cover is our first and most potent introduction to the quality of the story inside. How many of us have picked up a book, intrigued by its alluring front cover, read the blurb that seemed to resonate with the title and image, then upon reading our cherished purchase been disillusioned with the story and decided we disliked it and its author?

This is because, as readers, from the moment we pick up a book, we engage in a covenant with the story’s author (but in actual fact with the entire publishing company) for a story whose promise we have interpreted from its cover image, title and blurb. It begins with the cover. A book’s cover is its sales pitch: “This is what I’m about!” the cover proclaims in shades of color and texture. The cover sets the tone and attitude with which a reader will interpret the book’s title and back jacket blurb and its interior.

It had better be true.

Let me tell you a story…

Some time ago, a writer colleague of mine secured a New York agent—based on her excellent query and synopsis—for her imaginative dragon fantasy. The agent pitched the book to a large publishing company, who made my friend an offer, and the agent secured a three book deal on her behalf. My writing friend’s career as a published author was launched.

Because the publishing company was one of the large firms, my friend’s ability to participate—never mind influence—the cover design and blurb was restricted. Decisions lay in the hands of the people in the marketing department, who may or may not have read the book (most likely not). This is why it is so important to write a blurb / query / pitch that both scintillates AND accurately portrays the story. All too often, the marketing department misrepresents the story (to sell more books) and you end up with an unsatisfied reader. This is what happened to my friend. Through no fault of hers, the marketing people developed a cover that did not reflect the true nature of her story. The trilogy my friend had developed was a dark tale of deceit, betrayal and suffering. The cover portrayed a lively and sultry seductress, draped with flowing robes and bared thighs against her dragon; hardly the ponderous story shrouded within. The blurb at the back was sufficiently vague to aid and abet the deception.

What followed the book’s launch and accompanying ad campaign was a barrage of bad reviews and censure, unfortunately aimed mostly at the author.  It was unfortunate that my friend suffered the brunt of the accusations for breaking her promise to the readers, when she had done no such thing; her publisher and marketers had created false expectations. And now she was paying for it.

I, too, experienced the effects of mis-marketing. I’d written a dark science fiction romance that ended with resolution but was far from the traditional happy ending typical of a romance. The publisher marketed it as a romance with science fiction elements instead of a science fiction with romance elements. Reviewers applauded it but it bombed with romance readers, who expected a different kind of resolution. Science fiction readers, however, enjoyed it; they didn’t have the same expectations.

The take home lesson for writers is this: write a scintillating but accurate synopsis, blurb, pitch and query that clearly establishes your genre and audience. Chances are your publishers will use it in their marketing department. If you don’t get in with the “Big Boys”, and decide to go with the small presses, chances are very good that you will have more control over marketing and cover design; that is a big bonus. If you are like me, creative control of your intellectual property is more important than the big bucks you get at the expense of your art. Don’t give in to the temptations of wolf-marketing.

I’m still learning that lesson.

The take home lesson for readers is this: don’t judge a book by its cover; certainly pick up the book if it looks interesting, then read with an open mind and let the story take you to where it needs to, despite what you may have expected from the false advertising. Chances are, the unexpected journey visited upon you may be a welcome surprise. And don’t blame the writer for something he didn’t have control over.

I’m still learning that lesson too.

That was great, thank you, Nina!

Nina Munteanu is a Canadian ecologist and novelist.

In addition to five published novels, she has authored award-winning short stories, articles and non-fiction books, which have been translated into several languages throughout the world.

Recognition for her work includes the Midwest Book Review Reader’s Choice Award and the Aurora Award, Canada’s top prize in science fiction.

Nina lectures at university and teaches writing workshops and courses based on her award-nominated textbook The Fiction Writer: Get Published, Write Now!  Her award-winning blog The Alien Next Door hosts lively discussion on science, travel, pop culture, writing and movies. Visit www.ninamunteanu.com for more information and to book a coaching/workshop session or class with Nina.

Nina’s latest book is Outer Diverse, Book One of her “Splintered Universe Trilogy”, a paranormal space thriller, starring the indomitable and magnetic hero Rhea Hawke.

Thirty years have passed since the mysterious Vos invaded the galaxy to destroy Earth. If not for the intervention of the arrogant Eosians, who drove away the Vos for the right to inhabit Earth, humanity would have perished. But not all of humanity is thankful…

Rhea Hawke, Galactic Guardian, must solve the massacre of an entire spiritual sect, dubiously connected with the crime syndicate Eclipse and the toxic drug Glitter Dust, the resurgence of a dark prophesy and the return of the cruel extra-galactic Vos.

Her quest for justice catapults her into the heart of a universal struggle across alien landscapes of cruel beauty toward an unbearable truth she’s hidden from herself since she first murdered an innocent man with her eyes.

“… a master of metaphor, Munteanu turns an adventure story into a wonderland of alien rabbit holes. When the action starts it goes into hyper-drive … A fascinating and enthralling read.” Craig H. Bowlsby, author and creator of Commander’s Log.

Outer Diverse is available at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. The cover art by Costi Gurgu was recently nominated for an Aurora Prix for best artistic achievement.

If you would like to write a writing-related guest post for my blog then feel free to email me with an outline of what you would like to write about. If it’s writing-related then it’s highly likely I’d email back and say “yes please”.

The blog interviews return as normal tomorrow morning with science-fiction / general fiction author Karen A Wyle – the four hundred and fifteenth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2012 in articles, ebooks, ideas, novels, tips, writing

 

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Author Spotlight no.97 – Kristy Tate

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the ninety-seventh, is of historical romance and ghost fiction novelist Kristy Tate.

Kristy Tate is the author of Stealing Mercy, A Ghost of a Second Chance and the soon to be released The Rhyme’s Library. Kristy lives in Orange County, California but her heart belongs to the fictional town of Rose Arbor, Washington, home of the popular Rose Arbor series. She started writing stories that she kept hidden under her bed at age 8. She went to school, was editor of her high school newspaper, went to BYU and BYU’s International Center in London where she studied English Literature; she got married and had babies (six of them) and both took and taught piano lessons.

Although a homebody, she also love to travel and the list of places she’s visited is so long, she says, it’s boring. Currently, she lives in California, but grew up in Washington, attended school in Utah and London, and spent two years in Connecticut.

Her second novel placed fifth in an international writing contest, fourth novel a semi-finalist in the Amazon Novel Breakthrough contest and fifth novel, Stealing Mercy, placed second at the LDS StoryMaker’s First Chapter contest, historical category. She says that she’s been writing for so many years and been so many places and done so many things, that she will always have something to write about it. Most will stay beneath her bed, but some of it she shares on her blog at http://kristystories.blogspot.com.

And now from the author herself:

WHY I LIKE TO WRITE

Elizabeth George once said that she writes to stay sane. I do that, too. I also do it to keep everyone around me sane.

Writing keeps me from obsessing. Here’s me when I’m not writing: Carol drops by with a pan of brownies. She looks like a teenager in that halter top. She says, “I brought these for your husband to thank him for helping me fix that broken window.” I say thank you, but inside I’m thinking I really wish she’d wear more clothes. I wonder what she was wearing when Larry was at her house, for how long was that? I can’t compare myself to her—I had six kids and she has a dog. Maybe my abs would look like that if I had countless hours to spend at the gym. Does she work out at the same gym as Larry? Why does she call him all the time? He doesn’t even like brownies. But, I love them. I bet she knows that. She knows that I’m going to eat this entire pan of brownies because now I’m so depressed and one or two or five brownies isn’t going to matter because I’m going to be divorced and single and fat. I better call Larry, although I just talked to him and he’ll be home for lunch in twenty minutes, I need to hear his voice. 

Here’s me when I’m writing: the doorbell rings but I don’t hear it because I’m deep into my story. Somehow Mercy has to stop Eloise from going on a drive with horrid Mr. Steele. What can she do—should she confide in Eloise? In the real world, my dog is pawing at me. No. Eloise is a blabber mouth. She can’t be trusted. My dog knows someone has come to the door and she pulls at my sock with her teeth. I shake her off, but she’s so annoying that I have to investigate. Someone has left brownies on my front porch with a thank you note. It’s from Carol, that darling girl from across the street. I consider the brownies and inspiration hits—Mercy will bake Eloise a pie laced with a draught that will make her sleep through her rendezvous with Steele. I put the brownies on the counter and save them for when Larry comes home for lunch. I hurry back to Mercy, Eloise and Mr. Steele, wondering how to make a sleeping draught.
(FYI- Neighbor Carol is fictional, used to make a point about my own lunacy and not a commentary on my highly respectable, modestly clothed and admirable neighbors or my good husband who always lets me eat more than my fair share of brownies.)

Writing gives me someplace to put my head. As a mom, I do a lot of mindless things—driving, stirring, ironing, cleaning toilets—and while I’m doing these mindless tasks, it’s nice to have something to think about (other than my neighbor’s halter top.) I also love research. It’s like a treasure hunt that just keeps going. The internet is an endless source of information and if I can’t find what I need there, I try to think of people who might know and I call and ask them. No one has ever been annoyed. People love to believe that they’re experts and when I call with a question, they’re always happy to chat.

Writing gives me hope. Remember how I said that as a mom I do a lot of mindless things? I don’t really enjoy most of them. I do them because they have to be done, but I’d really rather not iron, clean toilets and mop floors. I’d like to pay someone else to do those things, but since my husband makes several dollars an hour and I make pennies, I can’t pay someone to do those mindless chores that must be done. It wouldn’t be fair. I’ve promised myself that when I’m making several dollars an hour that I’ll hire a chore person. I hope to someday make enough with my writing to justify that expense.

Writing gives me places to go. Remember how I said I love research? This summer I spent a day in Seattle visiting all the places that Laine and Ian would go. I walked through the neighborhood on Queen Anne Hill and took pictures of the turn of the century mansions. I stopped at Kerry Park and watched the boats in the harbor. And then I went to the University of Washington’s library, because that’s what Laine does in chapter four. I imagined her running down the steps and bumping into the girl with the smoothie. It’s like spending the day with very good friends.

Writing gives me insight. I like to think I’m sensitive and intuitive to those around me, but when it comes to my own psyche, I’m clueless. Being a baby born late in my parent’s life, I grew up in a house full of teenagers and adults. If I ever lost my temper, I was subjected to ridicule. (Angry or not, I was almost always subjected to ridicule, but that’s a different post.) I learned to shut down my emotions and I’m pretty good at masking and avoiding them. Writing brings them to the forefront. I’ll unconsciously do things like name annoying characters after annoying people. I’ll usually catch the real life and fictional connections on the rewrite and make the necessary changes, because I’m sensitive enough to know it’s unkind and unwise to hurt even annoying people’s feelings.

You can find more about Kristy and her writing via… http://kristystories.blogspot.com and her books are available at A Ghost of a Second Chance and Stealing Mercy are available on Amazon.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with literary novelist Christopher Profeta – the four hundred and fourteenth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
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Posted by on June 27, 2012 in ebooks, interview, novels, writing

 

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