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Daily Archives: August 18, 2012

Author Spotlight no.112 – Steve Emmett

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the one hundred and twelfth, is of horror, suspense and supernatural novelist Steve Emmett.

Steve Emmett is a British author with a keen interest in horror, suspense and the supernatural, and he is proud to be a member of the Society of Authors.  He has reviewed for the New York Journal of Books, Suspense Magazine and FEARDex but now concentrates more on his own writing and professional editing. As a writer he considers himself a late starter, having decided to put pen to paper just four years ago at the age of fifty.

Steve studied at the Architectural Association in the late 1970s after which he got involved with designing and building a few luxury houses. But he went off the rails and pursued further his love of Italy which had started during his student days.

After many years running his own London-based agency selling Italian country homes and estates, he moved to the Tuscan-Umbrian border in 2000, not only setting up home but founding a local branch of his UK agency. No surprise, then, that his highly acclaimed debut novel, Diavolino, is set in the very area Steve lived and knows so well. He retired from real work in 2009 to concentrate on writing. He is an opera fan and admits to being pro-Wagner, enjoys films by Peter Greenaway and music by Nyman and Glass.

And  now from the author himself…

I may be a horror fan but personally I’m not inclined towards violence of any kind. I have wondered, were I young enough to be called to arms should HM Government find it necessary, if I would be a conscientious objector. I think I might. Not because I’m a coward – I think anyone who knows me would testify that I’m quite willing and able to fight for what I believe in – but because I don’t think killing can ever be justified. And there are always two sides to a story – conflict, if you prefer – and both sides will claim quite earnestly that God is with them. Plainly, they can’t both be right.

Well, why do I start with such a subject on a writerly website? If you are a writer who hasn’t made the A list yet, you will know what I mean when I say that, despite my stance against violence, I really want to swipe my hand across the faces of people who give you that look (you know the one I mean – lips tight across the face, slightly turned down at the corners, eyes pooling with pity, head tilted to one side) when you tell them you’re a writer, or you want to be writer. Why do they do that? It’s because they believe you won’t make it, that it’s all just a dream. Poor little misled you. You need to go back to the 9-5 day job and be content. SMACK!

Of course you can do it. But you have to really, really want it. Not want it like you wanted that fortnight in Venice or the new car or the conservatory. Getting those was easy. Becoming a writer is the hardest thing you will ever do. When I decided in 2008 that I wanted to bring an end to my previous career and become an author, I had no idea how to write fiction. I’d written plenty of factual articles over the years and had some published, but ‘journalism’ is quite different from good story telling. At least I realised that, I suppose. The first thing I did was to sign up for a writing course. Now that’s a minefield, so be wary. There are lots of ways you can be parted from your money and I feel fortunate that I chose well. I came across a course run by the London School of Journalists. I took the novel writing course and had a wonderful tutor – the novelist Margaret James. After that it was just hard slog and determination. And sacrifice. Yes, learning to live on a fraction of what you’ve been used to isn’t easy – but nothing was going to stop me from making this change.

My first novel, Diavolino, got picked up by US publisher Etopia Press and is available as an e-book and paperback. I self-published a short story, Kid, just to see what the process was like and, really, to serve as a kind of loss leader for Diavolino. I still believe in publishers rather than self-publishing, and that’s why my second novel will soon be sent off to… Ah, you’ll have to wait and see!

So where am I after a bit less than four years? Not on the A list, for sure, so I still get those damned looks.  But I’m published and I earn money from my writing and from editing/tutoring. Onwards and upwards.

Now, did I mention luck? Luck plays a big part and I am not naturally lucky, I have to graft for everything. That’s OK, I’m used to it, I’ve worked it out by now. But you know those very rich people who smile and say ‘There’s no such thing as luck’? Don’t you just want to go… Smack!

Morgen: I do. I’m often just in the right place at the right time but yes, I graft too. 🙂 Thank you, Steve.

You can find more about Steve and his writing via… http://steve-emmett.com and http://thewritingcouch.com. His books are widely available including Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk, and Steve will also be one of the authors appearing at Northampton’s first ever Gay Literature Festival (14th-16th September), here in my home town (and where I’ll be talking about eBooking and writing groups!). 🙂

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The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with non-fiction author Jasha Levi – the four hundred and sixty-sixth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

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5a.m. Flash 180812 – Submission info. (non-fiction)

Every now and then at 5a.m. (probably posted by my clone) I will be bringing you a newsflash, update on what I’m doing, invited guest piece, or whatever takes my fancy. Today is the third in a mini-series of submission information (previously children’s & YA / flash fiction)…

Non-fiction

  • Canadian print magazine The Antigonish Review welcome poetry in any form (preferably 3-4, 8 max – payment US$30 per page), articles (1000-4000 words – payment US$100 flat rate) by post (Bonnie MsIsaac, Office Manager, PO Box 5000, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada B2G2W5. Fiction (500-3000 words – payment US$100 flat rate) can be emailed (TAR@stfx.ca).
  • Backhand Stories welcomes flash fiction/short stories, essays and reviews. They don’t pay but it’s always lovely to see your work in ‘print’ (online).
  • New visual arts magazine Canned is looking for writers to comment on theories, trends, projects artists and artworks within the discourse of contemporary practice. For more information you can also email them.
  • Classic Cars features are usually c.2,000 words (interview) and 2,5000 (single car feature).
  • Dangerous Little Books only publish non-fiction.
  • Delayed Gratification welcome non-fiction articles.
  • Online literary magazine Dog Weed seek poetry, fiction, and non-fiction.
  • Fifty Magazine welcomes articles aimed at those 50+.
  • US-based Flashquake is a quarterly ezine publishing flash fiction/non-fiction (max 1000 words) and short poetry (max. 35 lines). Email submit@flashquake.org. Submissions not accepted in February, May, August or November. Payment is US$5 to US$25.
  • Gardening articles are welcome at: Kitchen GardenGardens IllustratedThe English GardenGardener’s WorldGarden Design Journal and Grow Fruit & Veg.
  • H2Open Magazine invites articles about open water swimming.
  • Happy Homes USA welcomes “virtually anything you’ve got to say about your own home maintenance and improvement experience”.
  • Should you be a gardener Home Farmer magazine is looking for submissions, especially those of a traditional nature. Contact: Home Farmer, The Good Life Press Ltd, PO Box 536, Preston, England PR2 9ZY (or e-mail editor@homefarmer.co.uk).
  • Independent publisher Indigo Dreams are always on the lookout for quality work and are particularly seeking novels and non-fiction with a USP (unique selling point).
  • Ink Byte welcomes new articles and ideas for articles. Drop Steve Beisner or Melinda Palacio a note at editors@inkbyte.com.
  • Interlitq “accepts submissions for short fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. We do not accept any unsolicited material that has been previously published. If the material appears anywhere online, including your personal blog, we cannot consider it for publication.”
  • Australian literary magazine Island publishes “quality short stories (Aus$100), poetry (Aus$60), extracts from forthcoming novels, and articles and essays on topics of social, environmental and cultural significance (Aus$100 per 1,000 words).”
  • Itchy City magazine welcomes pieces about various cities around the UK.
  • Litro accepts short stories, flash fiction and creative non-fiction (max 3,000 words).
  • Lonely Planet welcomes emailed travel articles.
  • MG Owners Club welcome reports, reviews and articles. Details from MG Owners Club, Octagon House, Swavesey, Cambs CB24 4QZ.
  • A brilliant resource is My Perfect Pitch.com which has a page of publishers currently accepting book submissions.
  • http://www.newpages.com/classifieds/calls lists a variety of opportunities in varying genres.
  • Canadian publication The New Quarterly which takes submissions of short stories, poems, essays etc. See website or write to The New Quarterly, c/o St Jerome’s University, 290 Westmount Road North, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G3.
  • Quarterly US print/electronic magazine Ocean welcomes non-fiction stories, articles, essays, poems about the ocean (scientific, creative, environmental, recreational and spiritual).
  • Photo Pro & Photo Professional Magazine welcome well-illustrated articles (sent an outline). Email editorial@bright-publishing.com.
  • Irish broadcaster RTÉ invites contributions of original radio essays, reportage, appreciations, memory pieces, travel writing, personal accounts of events/happenings, and occasionally poetry for ‘Sunday Miscellany’, a radio and web programme.
  • Sailing Today pays £125 each for the first three 2,200-word pieces. Yachting Monthly is another opportunity and you can email yachting-monthly@ipcmedia.com.
  • 189 year old American bi-monthly magazine Saturday Evening Post welcome anecdotes/photos, non-fiction (on home, pet finance, 45+, how-to topics) and fiction (preferably light humour), ideally 1,000 to 2,000 words. Payment from $25 to £400+. Target audience is mainstream middle-aged American. Simultaneous submissions accepted. Response time is just 3-6 weeks.
  • Norfolk-based (UK) annual literary magazine The Savage Kick seeks submissions that will “make readers sit up and listen”. Short stories / novel excerpts (<6000 words) or articles / interviews (<3000 words). Response times are quick (aim <2 weeks!) but payment rates low £20 stories / £15 articles/interviews. They recommend you read the magazine before submitting.
  • Sollitary Magazine takes poetry, non-fiction, and fiction. Although Mexican, you don’t have to be.
  • California-based Three Penny Review welcomes fiction (max 4000 words) and poetry (max 100 lines). Payment US$400 per story / article, US$200 per poem plus year’s free subscription.
  • Canadian Tin House is looking for fiction (one story per submission), poetry (five poems max) and ‘economical, cultural and environmental’ non-fiction. Simultaneous submissions accepted.
  • What The Dickens magazine is actively looking for fiction, poetry, non-fiction and articles.
  • Other non-fiction opportunities include Kensington ReviewVintageHerStoriaSt Anthony Messenger PressWeavings.

If you do have any more information that could go on this page or find any broken links, old information etc., please email me.

And I’ve added a new sub-page (opportunities on this blog) which details the opportunities on my blog, you just need the questionnaire for your genre. 🙂

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You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2012 in non-fiction, submissions, writing

 

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