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Guest post: My Book Promotion Philosophy by Robert Rosen

04 Nov

Tonight’s guest blog post, on the topic of marketing, is brought to you by non-fiction author Robert Rosen.

My Book Promotion Philosophy

It happens to the best of them. Herman Melville, for example. Moby Dick, published to mixed reviews in 1851, didn’t find a lot of readers in Melville’s lifetime and wasn’t recognized as a great book till long after Melville was dead. I’ve heard writers say (though not recently) that they’re writing for future generations.

I was never much into the idea of “making it big” after I was dead. I mean really, what’s the point in spending years writing a book that nobody reads when you’re alive? Yes, I write for money, but the thing that keeps me going day after day, especially during those long stretches between fat (and not so fat) paychecks, is a primal need to communicate, which I’m not counting on being able to do from beyond the grave.

That’s why I’ve always done everything possible to bring my books to the attention of people who might enjoy reading them while I’m still here. My philosophy has always been: Talk to anybody who wants to talk to you about your book for as long as they want to talk about it, and go anywhere people are interested in your work. I’m the only American writer I know who’s traveled to Chile to do book promotion, and I’d do it again in a heartbeat if the opportunity presented itself.

Since 2000, when my John Lennon bio, Nowhere Man, was published, I’ve done more than 300 interviews, treating journalists from the most obscure websites as if they were Oprah. ’Cause you just never know. In fact, I’ve turned down only one interview request ever—from a Holocaust-denying conspiracy theorist who believes I’m the Zionist-funded CIA spymaster who gave the order to whack Lennon.

But there’s one thing I’ve never done and never will do to sell books: Pay for a positive review. A recent article in The New York Times pointed out that Amazon has been flooded with bogus five-star reviews written by critics who don’t read the books they’re reviewing and which authors are paying for: one review for $99, 50 for $999.

I wouldn’t do it because fake reviews sound fake; few people believe the reviews they read on Amazon; and even real five-star reviews (or rave reviews anywhere) don’t help much when it comes to selling books. (If they did, Beaver Street would be selling a lot better than it is.)

Which is to say, if I’m going to get more people to read Beaver Street while I’m alive, then I’m going to continue doing it the old fashion way—speak to anybody who wants to speak to me and go anywhere I’m invited.

Absolutely. Thank you, Robert!

Robert Rosen is the author of Nowhere Man: The Final Days of John Lennon, an international bestseller that’s been translated into six languages. His investigative memoir, Beaver Street: A History of Modern Pornography, was published by Headpress in the U.K. in 2011 and in the U.S. in 2012.

Robert’s work has appeared in publications all over the world, including Uncut (U.K.), Mother Jones, The Soho Weekly News, La Repubblica (Italy), VSD (France), Proceso (Mexico), Reforma (Mexico), and El Heraldo (Colombia). His website is http://www.robertrosennyc.com.

Thank you to Marcia Resnick for Robert’s photograph, and Robert will return on Friday 23rd May for our interview. 🙂

***

If you would like to write a writing-related guest post for my blog then feel free to email me with an outline of what you would like to write about. If it’s writing-related then it’s highly likely I’d email back and say “yes please”.

The blog interviews return as normal tomorrow morning with cosy murder mystery writer Sharon McGee – the five hundred and forty-second of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books and I also have a blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

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4 Comments

Posted by on November 4, 2012 in articles, ebooks, non-fiction, writing

 

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4 responses to “Guest post: My Book Promotion Philosophy by Robert Rosen

  1. avcarden

    November 5, 2012 at 7:30 pm

    As a massive John Lennon fan and also a fan of this book, I especially enjoyed reading this. A wonderful post. 🙂

     
    • morgenbailey

      November 5, 2012 at 10:00 pm

      Thank you, AV. I’ve emailed Robert.

       
  2. Robert Rosen

    November 5, 2012 at 10:01 pm

    Greetings from hurricane-ravaged NYC. Thank you very much. Always great to hear from readers, especially at times like this!.

     
  3. Toi Thomas

    November 6, 2012 at 2:24 am

    I like your ideas and your spirit. I too try to reach out to people who are interested in my work. It’s not easy, but I’m finding that I have more people from the UK interested in my book than the US, so I always look for ways to engage them from across the pond.

     

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