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Guest post: Ten Questions You Need to Ask Your Characters Before They Can Stay In Your Story by Nina Munteanu

09 Dec

Tonight’s guest blog post, on the topic of characters, is brought to you by science fiction / fantasy author, writing coach guest blogger, interviewee and spotlightee Nina Munteanu.

Ten Questions You Need to Ask Your Characters Before They Can Stay In Your Story

Your story lives and breathes through your characters. Through them your premise, idea and your plot come alive. Characters give your story meaning; they draw in the reader who lives the journey through them. Without them you wouldn’t have a story—you’d have a treatise.

Here are some questions you need to ask each of your characters:

  1. Will the story fall apart or be significantly diminished if you disappear? If not, you don’t need to be there; you aren’t fulfilling a role in the book. Hugo award winning author Robert J. Sawyer reminds us that “story-people are made-to-order to do a specific job”: they tell a story. In real life, people may act through no apparent motivation, be confusing, incoherent and make pointless statements or actions. Story characters show more clear motivations, coherence, and consistency. They don’t clutter your story with muddle and confusion like real people do. They fit into your story like a major puzzle piece.
  2. What is your role? (e.g., protagonist, antagonist, mentor, catalyst, etc.). Each character fulfills a dramatic function in your story. You can’t just be there because you’re cute. Well, ok, maybe. But even being cute can and should provide a dramatic function in the story by exploring how that quality is viewed and treated by others. As with setting, which serves a similar purpose as character in story, every aspect of both minor and major characters interact with and illuminate story theme, premise and plot.
  3. What archetype do you fulfill? In the “hero’s journey” plot approach, each character fulfills one to several archetypes, which help define how they service the plot and theme of the story. The mentor archetype, for instance, generally believes in and enables the hero on his journey. The threshold guardian, on the other hand does not have faith in the hero and obstructs him on his journey. The hero archetype, usually on a quest (for truth, forgiveness, home, victory, faith, etc.), must negotiate her world of archetypes to reach her destination.
  4. How do you contribute to the major or minor theme of the book? This is particularly relevant for all major characters and their associated sub-plots. Sawyer stresses that “your main character should illuminate the fundamental conflict suggested by your premise.” All other characters, in turn, either help reflect the main character’s journey or the overall story premise and theme. If your book is about forgiveness, each character helps illuminate your exploration of this theme.
  5. Are you unique? If the reader can’t distinguish you from other characters, chances are you need to be eliminated because of point number 1 anyway. In order to contribute to story, characters must provide a sufficiently distinguishable feature, complete with sub-plot, on the story landscape. The more varied and rich the landscape is, the more interesting it will be. Fictional characters achieve distinction through individual traits that readers recognize and empathize with. Authors use vernacular and body language to achieve colorful fictional characters.
  6. Are you interesting? If you aren’t interesting to the reader, you won’t do your job. Readers need to notice you, distinguish you and find something about you that will keep their interest—even if it’s something annoying. Just remember to be consistent—unless inconsistency is part of your character.
  7. What is your story arc? Do you develop, change, and learn something by the end? If not, you will be two-dimensional and less interesting. This is just as true for minor characters as for main characters. The more characters the author imbues with the depth to develop, the more multi-layered the story will become. This is because each character and her associated arc provides her own perspective to the theme. This is what is truly meant by “richness” — not the richness of infinite detail, like a baroque painting, but of infinite meaning like an impressionist work. Choose your minor characters as you choose your major characters.
  8. What major obstacle(s) must you overcome? You need these to struggle and “grow” and change; otherwise there is no tension in the story, no development and movement and no story arc. Your character will be like a still-life with no movement, no direction and no interest. The more your character changes over a story, the more she will be noticed and remembered.
  9. What’s at stake for you (theme), and for the world (plot), and how do these tie together? If a writer is unable to tie these together in story, the story will fail to evoke emotional involvement and empathy. It will lack cohesiveness and will not give the reader a fulfilling conclusion with ultimate satisfaction through the character’s journey related to theme (the hero’s journey, essentially).
  10. Do you change from beginning to end? If you don’t develop throughout the story, then you aren’t growing as a result of the thematic elements and plot issues presented in the story. In other words, you haven’t learned your lesson. While it’s ok for some characters not to develop (e.g., to be one note or flat or plain old stubbornly the same) this is disastrous for any of your main characters. Just ensure that the changes you make your character go through are warranted and relevant to the theme.

Characters help the writer achieve empathy and commitment from the reader. Characters are really why readers keep reading. If the reader doesn’t invest in the characters, she won’t really care what happens next. It is important to be mindful of the emotional and narrative weight of a character and achieve balance between characters. For instance, the foil of the protagonist should carry equal weight; otherwise the reader won’t believe the match-up. Equally, a large cast—often used in epic fantasies or historical pieces—can be used successfully, but only if each character is given a clearly distinguishable personality and role.

That was great. Thank you, Nina!

nina-fireplace-crop01-close2-webNina Munteanu is a Canadian ecologist and novelist. In addition to five published novels, she has authored award-winning short stories, articles and non-fiction books, which have been translated into several languages throughout the world.

Recognition for her work includes the Midwest Book Review Reader’s Choice Award and the Aurora Award, Canada’s top prize in science fiction.

Nina lectures at university and teaches writing workshops and courses based on her award-nominated textbook The Fiction Writer: Get Published, Write Now!

Last Summoner

Her award-winning blog The Alien Next Door hosts lively discussion on science, travel, pop culture, writing and movies. Visit www.ninamunteanu.com for more information and to book a coaching / workshop session or class with Nina.

Her latest book, just released this autumn by Starfire, is The Last Summoner, a historical fantasy about a young baroness who discovers she can alter history.

The book is currently enjoying Canadian Bestseller status at Amazon.ca in Historical Fantasy.

***

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11 responses to “Guest post: Ten Questions You Need to Ask Your Characters Before They Can Stay In Your Story by Nina Munteanu

  1. Sophie E Tallis

    December 9, 2012 at 9:10 pm

    I LOVE this! Apart from the interesting notion of asking your characters such questions it also opens up another vista…In an era of such vacuous ‘talent’ and reality shows where contestants are voted off, that same format could be applied in an intelligent and intriguing way to a novel and its characters! Prove that as a character you are worthy of inclusion!

    Another fabulous post. 😀

     
  2. morgenbailey

    December 9, 2012 at 9:16 pm

    Thank you, Sophie, and Nina of course for writing it. 🙂

     
  3. Toi Thomas

    December 9, 2012 at 10:41 pm

    I love this. I think on some level I done something similar to this when creating and developing my characters. My biggest thing I do to keep focus on characters that actually matter is that I give them names. There are so many minute characters that come in an out of a story, to serve some purpose or another, but I only give characters names if I feel they are truly pivitl to the story in some way.

     
  4. thealiennextdoor

    December 10, 2012 at 4:09 am

    You’re so welcome, Sophie and Tol. Glad you enjoyed the article and it stirred up some cool thoughts. Thanks for sharing your thoughts too. Morgen, thanks for inviting me to share here on your awesome site! Hope to come back some time soon… 🙂

     
    • morgenbailey

      December 10, 2012 at 8:46 am

      You’re very welcome, Nina. Thank you for writing such a great piece and yes, do come back. I have had regular guest bloggers where I post them every six weeks. 🙂

       
  5. Christi

    December 10, 2012 at 7:25 am

    Great list of questions! Sometimes it’s hard to let go of a character you love, and these questions can really help remind you why it’s the right thing to do sometimes. Thanks for sharing this.

     
    • morgenbailey

      December 10, 2012 at 8:45 am

      Thank you very much, Christi. I’ve passed your comment on to Nina.

       
  6. Books & Art - Spirit & Soul - Lesley Fletcher

    December 10, 2012 at 1:15 pm

    I feel like the little engine that could actually will (finally) write that novel thanks to posts like these. I have gathered a wealth of information from this site over the past year – many thanks Nina and Morgen !

     
  7. thealiennextdoor

    December 11, 2012 at 1:53 am

    Thanks, Christi. Glad you were able to get something useful from the article. Leslie, thanks for your kind words and for sharing your enthusiasm.

    Best Wishes,
    Nina

     

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