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Post-weekend Poetry: Writing a Sonnet

08 Feb

Welcome to Post-weekend Poetry. Last week, I posted some of my fibonacci in the second of a short series (following up on haikus), introducing you to the shorter forms of poetry. You can read the post on Haiku here and on Fibonacci here. Today, we are looking at sonnets. Wikipedia explains them as the following…

“A sonnet is a poetic form which originated in Italy; Giacomo Da Lentini is credited with its invention. The term sonnet is derived from the Italian word sonetto (from Old Provençal sonet a little poem, from sonsong, from Latin sonus a sound). By the thirteenth century it signified a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure. Conventions associated with the sonnet have evolved over its history. Writers of sonnets are sometimes called “sonneteers”, although the term can be used derisively.”

The rhyming scheme mentioned is A, B, A, B, C, D, C, D, E, F, E, F, G, G) where each letter rhymes with its mate.

I’ve written very few (because I don’t write much poetry) but here’s one which is about… the title gives it away.🙂

*

Writing a Sonnet

The rules say the lines must total fourteen

Easier said than done is what I think

Then to add a trick, and to be so mean

Have ten syllables per line, what a stink!

 

1c coffee 940641I’ll give it a go but it may not work

If it takes many hours, I won’t give up

I’ll keep on ‘til the end, I shall not shirk

Down to the dregs of my cold coffee cup

 

It’s coming together, just bit by bit

I’m ever so pleased and give a big ‘whoop’

But it all goes wrong. I slump where I sit

Then pick myself up and vow to regroup

 

Then near the end, it starts to take shape

It’s done. Oh, hoorah! I can now escape!

***

If you’d like to submit your poem (60 lines max) for consideration for Post-weekend Poetry take a look here or a poem for critique on the Online Poetry Writing Group (link below).

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2 Comments

Posted by on February 8, 2016 in poetry, writing

 

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2 responses to “Post-weekend Poetry: Writing a Sonnet

  1. Tim French

    February 12, 2016 at 12:45 pm

    I’ve attempted to construct a sonnet but find it too difficult, really. I’ll have to try harder, I suppose!

     
    • morgenbailey

      February 12, 2016 at 12:50 pm

      They’re not easy, are they, Tim. From memory, this is the only one I’ve ever written… maybe one more maximum, but just wait til you read the next two weeks’ worth and a sonnet will seem like a piece of cliched cake!

       

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