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A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18: ‘Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?’

28 Dec
A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18: ‘Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?’

As much of England is covered in frost, I thought I’d share with you something of a warmer nature…

Interesting Literature

A summary of a classic Shakespeare poem

‘Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?’ is one of the most famous opening lines in all of literature. In this post, we’re going to look beyond that opening line, and the poem’s reputation, and attempt a short summary and analysis of Sonnet 18 in terms of its language, meaning, and themes. The poem represents a bold and decisive step forward in the sequence of Sonnets as we read them. For the first time, the key to the Fair Youth’s immortality lies not in procreation (as it had been in the previous 17 sonnets) but in Shakespeare’s own verse. But what is William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 actually saying?

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime…

View original post 890 more words

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Posted by on December 28, 2016 in writing

 

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