A Summary and Analysis of Saki’s ‘Gabriel-Ernest’

Ah, short stories. My first love.

Interesting Literature

A reading of a chilling short story

Saki, real name Hector Hugh Munro (1870-1916), was a master of the very short story, and as well as penning dozens of witty Edwardian short stories consisting of just a few pages, he also left us several short horror fiction masterpieces, of which ‘Gabriel-Ernest’ (1909) is probably the most famous and widely studied. The story, about a teenage boy who transforms into a werewolf and preys on small children, manages to appal and unsettle in just five pages of masterly storytelling. You can read ‘Gabriel-Ernest’ here.

As we revealed in our analysis of Saki’s ‘The Lumber-Room’, much of Saki’s fiction reads like a direct challenge to the Victorian notion that children are paragons of innocence. ‘Gabriel-Ernest’ is worthy of closer analysis because it explores a similar idea, but using Gothic horror fiction as its vehicle. But the story is still shot…

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One thought on “A Summary and Analysis of Saki’s ‘Gabriel-Ernest’

  1. Fay Knowles says:

    Thanks for this, Morgen. As a short story writer myself, I really enjoyed Saki’s story Gabriele-Ernest. It’s actually quite modern for the period! Sad that this brilliant writer died at only 46 years old.

    Like

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