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A WRITER’S JOURNEY BOOK PROMOTION: ONLY ONE WOMAN by CHRISTINA JONES AND JANE RISDON…

So exciting… what a collaboration this is.

JO LAMBERT - A WRITER'S JOURNEY

Jane Risdon has been a great friend of mine for quite a while.  With her long career in the music business she became an invaluable source of information and support during the time I was writing The Other Side of Morning where rock star Christian Rosetti featured as one of the main characters.

And now I’m really pleased to be able to return the compliment with a pre-publication promotion for her forthcoming collaboration with Christina Jones…

ONLY ONE WOMAN

Two women, one love story.

June 1968. Renza falls head over heels for heart throb guitarist Scott. But after a romantic summer together they are torn apart when Renza’s family moves away.

December 1968. On the night she believes to be her last, Stella meets Scott at a local dance. He’s the most beautiful boy she’s ever seen and if this one night is all they have, she’ll take it.

As the final colourful…

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Posted by on September 21, 2017 in writing

 

Here is my interview with Jane Risdon

Jane’s “I’ve read every book Christina Jones has written” made me smile as I’m sure Christina (and almost every author) have material that has never seen the cliched light of day. Congrats on your first ‘baby’, Jane.

authorsinterviews


Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie
.

Hello Fiona, thanks for inviting me here. This is really cool. I hope your readers enjoy reading this.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Jane Risdon and I’m old enough to know better.

Fiona: Where are you from?

Born in England, a citizen of the world.

Fiona: A little about yourself (ie: your education, family life, etc.).

I was born into an Army family and travelled throughout my childhood as a result, living overseas a lot of the time.

Married a musician with whom I have a son. Our family has travelled and lived over-seas mostly, and our son still lives in Los Angeles.

Family life on the road with his band, and later when we went into management of singers, songwriters, record producers, and being…

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Posted by on September 18, 2017 in writing

 

Short Story Saturday Story 001: A Walk to Destiny by Jane Risdon

Welcome to the new Short Story Saturday story slot and the first story in this series. Because I have a 1,000-word limit on the Flash Fiction Fridays, I’ve decided (helped by Jane!) to add a story to the SSS slot and I shall be alternating (because I just don’t have the time to do both, sorry!) between a full short story and a review. Here is one of Jane’s, a great 1,410-worder. 🙂

A Walk To Destiny

The ancient wooden gate creaked loudly as she pushed against it. The leaf-dappled lane she found herself in smelled of damp earth, moss, and rotting leaves which stuck to the bottoms of her walking shoes as she made her way slowly, taking in the sheer peace of the place. As sunlight filtered through the heavy tree canopy and danced upon the ground in front of her she could hear rustling and fluttering as birds and other small animals moved about their business inside the thick green hedges stretching as far as she could see on either side of the lane.

Overhead high in the blue cloudless sky an aeroplane droned as it climbed higher and she thought how typical of a summer day that sound was. It never failed to remind her of her childhood. She was transported back to about age five, reading ‘Dick and Dora’ and ‘Janet and John’, somewhere outside, bathed in sunshine and with the smell of freshly-mown grass. Somehow it made her feel safe and happy.

After a few minutes she came to a stile, made of rusted iron overgrown with vegetation, and she took great care climbing over it – even though she wore jeans – she was wary of the stinging nettles.

She stood looking around at the slight change of landscape. To her left there was a vast expanse of farmland, some fields looked as if something was growing there, but she could not see what, other fields looked fallow.

Beyond the fields in the distance the land rose and was covered in a mass of green. Dark green, light green and almost grey-green leafed trees seemed to hover above the fields. They looked wonderful against the blue sky; almost Germanic. Memories of the Ruhr valley came to mind and the endless swathes of forests she had loved when she had lived there a lifetime ago. All along the River Ruhr where housing gave way to forest, the countryside was beautiful and so lush. She had spent many hours walking through them in her youth. If only she had possessed a camera back then, she thought, as she gazed at the scenery. Now she only had her memories to fall back on. She turned to her right and in a huge clearing the ruins of an old farmhouse stood, with roofless outbuildings and a side-less barn which still held various decaying farm implements, such as a hay wagon made of wood and rusted metal, some sort of cutting machine which looked as if it had been cut in two. A big old-fashioned rolling machine, which had two huge rusting drums attached to a long handle which she thought must have been for flattening something once.

An old tractor had been left with doors open and was now overgrown with weeds and a young oak tree seemed to be sprouting from the driver’s seat, the leather rotted long ago. The tractor was similar to those used in the fields which rose high behind her grandparents’ home where she used to play as a child, long before combined harvesters and real mechanisation had taken over farming.

When she was a child she used to run alongside Spangle, the local farm-hand, as he pulled various machinery for cutting hay, bundling it behind his rickety old tractor, and then she and her friends and siblings would help by stacking the square bales of hay. Sometimes they would make dens inside them, hidden from the world where they would play for hours. No-one seemed to worry where they might be.

Other times she would collect eggs at the local farm and take little lozenge shaped pellets which had an oaty smell, to feed the cows as they were milked in the milking parlour, a million years away from the modern mechanised milking of cows she had seen on television programmes like ‘Country Ways’ and ‘Country Tracks’, which even now she really enjoyed watching.

Often she would help the farmer and Spangle pick and collect the potatoes when they were ready and the smell of the earth in the lane reminded her of the smell as they harvested the potatoes. Later they would visit the farmer’s mother in the warm cosy farmhouse kitchen and have a glass of homemade lemonade and hot newly baked biscuits or cakes.

The farmhouse has now been turned into a Harvester’s pub and restaurant, however, the original building seems to be almost the way it was in her childhood, with obviously modern additions.

She had been once inside just to look around. It was a really strange feeling to stand in the bar, once the kitchen, and remember how it was back then. The huge fireplace had been retained, so had the low beams and there were sepia photographs displayed of the original buildings and farm. She had found it a very sad experience. Sad for the house and the farm and those she knew who had lived and worked there, and sad for herself; her lost childhood and her happy memories. For the first time in years she wondered whatever had become of Spangle. He had slept in the big barn and had his meals in the farmhouse but as far as she could recall, he had never had a proper home. He must be dead long ago, she mused.

Somewhere in the distance she could hear sheep bleating and following their cries she could just about make out a flock high on a ridge to the left of the farm where a field stretched into the distance. She wondered where the farm they belonged was located. The farm next to her had long been abandoned which had her wondering what had happened to cause it to be deserted, seemingly in a hurry given what had been left behind. It must have been good working machinery back then and the house would still have been habitable, a mystery which would remain unsolved unless she met someone she could ask. She didn’t think she would however.

The lane continued past the farm and became more and more overgrown until it was impossible to go further. She looked around deciding what to do; try and cross the field where the sheep were and take the faster route home, or go back the way she had come. Looking at her watch she decided she had time to retrace her steps, enjoying the warm sunshine and the scenery.

She needed this walk, to clear her mind and refresh her spirit. So far it seemed to be working.

The fresh air, warmth of the sun and the beautiful scenery filled her with a calm contentment and her fears and anxieties began to be absorbed into the peace and tranquillity that surrounded her.

Now she could think clearly and she stopped for a moment, listening to the sounds of nature around her.

She belonged here, in this place, in this time, in this skin. She had every right to exist just as the animals and birds and vegetation around her had a right to this space and time. Bending down she touched a fern and recalled how ferns had been on this planet since the very beginning and no doubt would be here long after she had gone. Long after he had gone.

He. He crept back into her consciousness, ruining the moment. He. She took a deep breath and exhaled slowly through her mouth. She tasted the earth and the vegetation on the back of her throat and her resolve stiffened.

Looking around her she was filled with an overwhelming sense of self, of her ability to cope with anything; at last, courage. Courage to face what was to come, to face Him. She thrust her chest out and straightened her back and began to walk purposefully back along the lane.

She reached the stile and hesitated for a second or two as she gazed along the lane on the other side. Somewhere deep down she knew, she felt, that once she crossed over the stile to the other side there was no going back. She would have to carry on now that her mind was made up.

Whatever the outcome, there was no going back. The decision was made. She mounted the stile and as she alighted on the other side she knew that ahead was her walk to destiny. She felt strong.

© Jane Risdon 2012

Thank you, Jane. I love a strong female protagonist. 🙂

For the last thirty years Jane Risdon has worked in the International Music Industry as an Artiste Manager, Producer and Music Publisher with her husband who was a professional musician when they met in their teens.

Together they have discovered, mentored and guided the careers of Singers, Bands, Songwriters and Producers all over Europe, the USA and SE Asia as well as the UK, resulting in Chart hits, TV and Movie Soundtracks and numerous other successes, including launching the very first Industry Showcases at the London Hippodrome in the mid 1980s.

She has lived and worked in Singapore, Taiwan, Germany, USA, as well as Europe and England – working with English, American, European and Chinese artists in all genres of music and in various languages including Mandarin and Cantonese.

Jane has been writing since childhood and has had articles published in the Music Press. Her main genre is Crime writing; mysteries and thrillers – usually with a twist in the tale.  At the moment she is writing a crime story, ‘Ms Birdsong Investigates’, which features and ex-MI5 Officer and her new life in a rural Oxfordshire Village.  This novel should be completed by early 2013.

In addition to this novel she has a series of stories which she describes as Character Based Gentle Humour, called ‘God’s Waiting Room’, which she hopes will be completed next year.

Jane is also co-writing a novel with an award-winning author of over 28 books. They hope they will complete their joint venture early in 2013.

With numerous Short Stories and several Flash Fiction pieces under her belt she is a prolific writer who is yet to publish a book in her own right.  However, she has had several short stories published for Charity during the last year including her story, ‘The Look’, in ‘I am Woman Anthology Volume 1’, in aid of Breakthrough, Women for Women and Women’s Aid and two stories, ‘The Debt Collector’ and ‘The Ghost in the Privy’, published in the anthology, ‘Telling Tales’, in aid of The Norfolk Hospice.

Jane also has written a chapter for a new book project, which features several authors all writing a chapter each, without any idea of what the other has written.  She found this great fun and looks forward to reading the finished book. Jane would like to thank Morgen Bailey for all her support and for publishing her Flash Fiction stories and Short stories, and she wishes her much success with her own novel.

Jane Risdon (Author) Blog: http://janerisdon.wordpress.com

Jane Risdon (Author) Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/JaneRisdon2

The ‘I am Woman Anthology Volume 1’ is available on Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

:*) You’re welcome, Jane, thank you, and good luck with your novel. 🙂

***

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with crime novelist Mike Walters – the five hundred and sixty-second of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do, and I also review stories of up to 3,000 words on Short Story Saturdays. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 3,000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me posting it online in my new Red Pen Critique Sunday night posts, then do email me. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2012 in blog, Facebook, short stories, writing

 

Tags: , , ,

Flash Fiction Friday 011: ‘The White Witch of England’ by Jane Risdon

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the eleventh piece of flash fiction in this series. This week’s piece is a 984-worder entitled ‘The White Witch of England’ by Jane Risdon.

‘What the hell was that all about?’ David asked as we drove back from our meeting with The White Witch of England and her coven at the WI in Leighton Buzzard.

‘No idea,’ I said, ‘but she was spot on… How could she be? We’ve never given any her any personal information ’

‘Freaked me,’ said David, ‘How did she know about the black panther? I’ve never told anyone ever. I’ve always wanted one.’

‘Poseur,’ I laughed.

‘Shut up. Are we going to book them?’

We had interviewed our fair share of Clairvoyants, Mediums and various charlatans during the last year, vetting guests for our live show, but my co-producer and I had no I idea what to expect, neither having met a Witch before, Black or White.

A neat little woman in a two-piece suit with pearl necklace met us at the hall,

‘Dot will be out soon,’ directing us to our place of honour in front of a pair of high-backed wicker chairs.

Full of women, the hall fell silent. Everyone waited… I got my tape recorder ready.

The lights dimmed, someone began playing a harp. We exchanged amused glances when a large 50 something vision dressed from neck to toes in white tulle with flowers in her obviously dyed long black hair, took her seat in front of us, bowing and smiling.

I was about to speak when a small man appeared, impersonating Howard Keel in ‘The Thief of Baghdad’, with curly toed slippers, long drooping moustache: a little fez on his head. Feeling David’s shoulders shaking next to me I took a deep breath steadying myself, fighting laughter.

We gazed at the pair of them. The harpist played as Dot stood, hand held out to me. I stood, taking it.

‘Greetings, welcome to our coven,’ her grip like iron, her deep brown eyes gazed into mine.

‘Thank you,’ I said.

The coven clapped.

Turning to David, she did the same to him. He elbowed me and I nearly laughed. What the hell had we got into this time? Repeating her welcome, the coven clapped.

Turning, she introduced her consort ‘Merlin’.

I was fighting the good fight. David gulped suppressing his mirth. Merlin?

Merlin held our hands, then indicated we sit.

The harpist played on.

Before I could question her, Dot looked straight at me, saying I’d been a witch: burned at the stake on Pendle Hill in a past life, and I’d been a model for Gainsborough.

I opened my mouth but she raised her hand. ‘I’m a true Romany. I speak the truth’.

David giggled.

‘You fear water and fire. You love natural herbs and remedies.’

I nearly fell off my perch. How could she be right? Though Pendle Hill was news.

To David, ‘You have creative talents. I see you walking a black cat on a golden lead: a black Panther’.

David gaped. I wished our cameraman had come.

‘Don’t speak. I’m right.’ Everyone clapped.

We gawked. Merlin smiled, bowed, wiggling his curly toes as Dot placed her hands on our heads.

‘Both old souls,’ she said. ‘You’ve many lives to come, such old souls’.

Then she left. Floating away with Merlin shuffling behind

The harpist played, the coven clapped. We stopped laughing.

Never getting our interview, we were quickly ushered outside.

‘She’s right. I can’t go near Pendle Hill. I never knew why’.

Our Production team met later that day, deciding to book them for our first show. Everyone wanted to meet The White Witch and her Consort, Merlin, convinced they’d performed some sort of weird telepathy on us.

Of all the clairvoyants and mediums on our show they were the most consistently accurate with randomly chosen subjects.

We had to believe it really was Witchcraft. There wasn’t any other explanation. Was there?

***

I asked Jane what prompted this piece and she said…

Working in the International Music Business most of my life I have often been asked to get involved with new projects and experiences, such as the TV and Movie aspects of the Entertainment Industry.

For many years during the 1980’s and 1990’s my husband and I ran monthly Showcases at the London Hippodrome for new talent, mostly bands and solo artists. However, with the birth of satellite and the need to fill hours of programming in those early days, we were asked by a Production company to help source Clairvoyants, Mediums and other similarly ‘gifted’ people to take part in a live broadcast each month, from the club using randomly chosen members of the club audience.

This is the story of one such group of individuals we interviewed for the show, names changed of course.

In the end the show never aired. The information given by Dot was actually very accurate, but on the whole most of those we met were (we felt) either charlatans or very lucky.

***

Or knew how to steer to get the right information. Thank you Jane. My mum lives near Leighton Buzzard and something tells me I won’t be seeing it in the same light again. 🙂 The ‘WI’, in case any of our overseas visitors are wondering, is what we call the Women’s Institute.

For the last thirty years Jane Risdon has worked in the International Music Industry as an Artiste Manager, Producer and Music Publisher with her husband who was a professional musician when they met in their teens.

Together they have discovered, mentored and guided the careers of Singers, Bands, Songwriters and Producers all over Europe, the USA and SE Asia as well as the UK, resulting in Chart hits, TV and Movie Soundtracks and numerous other successes, including launching the very first Industry Showcases at the London Hippodrome in the mid 1980s.

She has lived and worked in Singapore, Taiwan, Germany, USA, as well as Europe and England – working with English, American, European and Chinese artists in all genres of music and in various languages including Mandarin and Cantonese.

Jane has been writing since childhood and has had articles published in the Music Press. Her main genre is Crime writing; mysteries and thrillers – usually with a twist in the tale.  At the moment she is writing a crime story, ‘Ms Birdsong Investigates’, which features and ex-MI5 Officer and her new life in a rural Oxfordshire Village.  This novel should be completed by early 2013.

In addition to this novel she has a series of stories which she describes as Character Based Gentle Humour, called ‘God’s Waiting Room’, which she hopes will be completed next year.

Jane is also co-writing a novel with an award-winning author of over 28 books. They hope they will complete their joint venture early in 2013.

With numerous Short Stories and several Flash Fiction pieces under her belt she is a prolific writer who is yet to publish a book in her own right.  However, she has had several short stories published for Charity during the last year including her story, ‘The Look’, in ‘I am Woman Anthology Volume 1’, in aid of Breakthrough, Women for Women and Women’s Aid and two stories, ‘The Debt Collector’ and ‘The Ghost in the Privy’, published in the anthology, ‘Telling Tales’, in aid of The Norfolk Hospice.

Jane also has written a chapter for a new book project, which features several authors all writing a chapter each, without any idea of what the other has written.  She found this great fun and looks forward to reading the finished book.

Jane Risdon (Author) Blog: http://janerisdon.wordpress.com

Jane Risdon (Author) Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/JaneRisdon2

The ‘I am Woman Anthology Volume 1’ is available on Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

***

If you’d like to submit your 1,000-word max. stories for consideration for Flash Fiction Friday take a look here.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with literary / crime author Avril Joy – the two hundred and sixth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
3 Comments

Posted by on December 2, 2011 in short stories, writing

 

Tags: , , ,

Crime Writer Nell Peters is my guest author today: discussing research and the suspension of disbelief.

Lots to like (and learn) from this article from Nell Peters courtesy of the fab Jane Risdon. Never good when you’re will for ‘The End’… Nell has more patience than many. And yes, never include EVERYTHING you research and what you do include has to be 100% believable if it’s not 100% true. Let your reader pick one fault and they won’t trust you thereafter. And I didn’t know Accent published crime… mmm, tempting to polish my dusty tomes. 🙂

Jane Risdon

Crime Writer Nell PetersCrime Writer Nell Peters

Ann Polhll Nell Peter book blurb 4

Today I am very pleased to welcome fellow Accent Press Author and Facebook pal, 

Crime writer

Nell Peters.

Hi everybody! I’m very happy to be Jane’s guest today – she writes such informative and interesting blogs (with great pics!), I will have to mind my Ps and Qs and make sure I don’t send everyone running for the nearest stash of alcohol and or cake.

I thought I’d combine and discuss two already closely associated elements of writing here – research and whether fiction should always be 100% factual, as it were.

It was last autumn that I really started to mull over the latter in some depth, when I was a reader for the Romantic Novelist Awards, presented in March 2016. Though I don’t tend to read romance per se, that’s not because I feel it doesn’t warrant my attention – it’s simply that I…

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Posted by on August 10, 2016 in writing

 

Father’s Day – don’t forget In A Word: Murder

It’s been too long since I reblogged from (or indeed visited) Jane Risdon’s blog and this post, about Father’s Day, was posted on what would have been my father’s 85th birthday… and it’s a crime anthology, my favourite genre. I’m off now to buy it so I can review it on my blog later in the summer. 🙂

Jane Risdon

In A Word: Murder. Published 3rd November 2013.  Crime Anthology In A Word: Murder. Published 3rd November 2013. Crime Anthology

I’ve dropped in today just to remind you about a super Father’s Day gift:

IN A WORD: MURDER 

a Crime Anthology featuring some really FAB stories by writers from all over the world

which is available via Kindle and Paperback from amazon.com and amazon.co.uk

Not only will your Father be over the moon with some really great reading matter but he will be content in the knowledge that the gift you gave gift has gone towards helping someone at the end of their life being cared for in The Princess Alice Hospice in Surrey.

The USA Paperback version is available via

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1495931684/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_vx6.sb15V2W6V7KJ

The USA Kindle version is available via

 http://www.amazon.com/In-Word-Murder-An-Anthology-ebook/dp/B00GFXNZYE/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1383674275&sr=8-8&keywords=in+a+word%3A+murder

 The UK Paperback version is available via

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1495931684/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_FC6.sb0RABYAV

The UK Kindle is available via

http://www.amazon.co.uk/In-Word-Murder-An-Anthology-ebook/dp/B00GFXNZYE/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1383674321&sr=8-12&keywords=In+word+Murder

I call this the gift which keeps on giving.

 Do please consider giving this book to someone you…

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Posted by on June 10, 2014 in writing

 

Other Writing-Related WordPress Blogs

Below is a list of some of the rebloggable* writing-related WordPress blogs I’ve come across in my travels (*rebloggable = WordPress.com sites with a ‘reblog’ option at the top (when logged in), hosted by WordPress rather than a third-party organisation).

Do you have a (predominantly) writing-related WordPress blog that you’d be happy for me to reblog from? If so, please email me.

If you know of others, do let me know.

 

6-word FFFs

** 6-WORDERS ARE CURRENTLY BOOKING INTO LATE MAY
UP TO TEN STORIES PER AUTHOR PER MONTH
(with their 6-word biographies)
Deadline: the Wednesday before the final Friday of the month
(stories received thereafter will roll over to the following batch)**

lightning 143523Inspired by a guest blog piece entitled ‘Writing Flash Memoir‘ by flash fiction and non-fiction author Jane Hertenstein, I have been running, from 26th July 2013, Flash Fiction Fridays compiled solely of 6-word fiction on the last Friday of the month, together with 6-word biographies.  (click on the green ‘batch’ links below to read the stories)

Ernest Hemingway’s ‘For Sale: Baby Shoes, Never Worn’ is the most well-known example. It can tell us a ‘now’ or ongoing situation, a feeling, anything you like, but it has to make sense (and ideally have a start, middle and end!). See below for examples…

Guidelines: If you’d like your 6-word stories considered, complete the form below with:

  • your family-friendly (no swearing, extreme violence etc.) 6-word stories. No titles, just the stories. You can submit as many stories as you like (via the form below) but I only run a maximum of ten per author per month so some may appear in later months (they run the last Friday of each month). No need to number them, just list on separate lines (with no blank lines in between). This makes it easier for me to copy / paste into my template. Thanks.
  • your 6-word third-person biography e.g. John Smith (linked to http://johnsmith.com), vampire writer by night. Yes, not kidding. Your name will count as two words (or one if you just want to use your first name or a nickname, and I can link your website to it) so you have 4-5 words to tell us all about you. 🙂
  • That’s it. No photo, no book synopsis, just your 6-worders and 6-word biography. And please remember to include your website address, Amazon page or book link. If you don’t have one but want one, I design WordPress blogs / websites from just £100 / $150.
  • If it’s suitable, I’ll either email you with the Friday I plan to run it and your name will be added to the schedule on this page as well as on the Flash Fiction Fridays page (for which I welcome submissions of up to family-friendly 500 words) or if near the deadline, I will just run the 6-worders on the final Friday and send you the link.
  • The deadline is the Wednesday before the final Friday of the month (midnight UK time). Any received thereafter will be posted with the following month’s batch. The limit is ten per month per author (plus their 6-word biography). Any additional six-worders received will roll over to the following month’s batch providing they are suitable.
  • NB. only submit via the form below. Do not email your stories to me, do not submit via the comments section either below or in another post, e.g. not on a previous or current month’s batch once they have gone live.
  • You are also welcome to enter my free 100-word competition (again via its own submission form to the relevant month’s theme ensuring your story is 100 words exactly, no more, no less).

NOTE: Because of the high volume of enquiries received generally, I don’t schedule in advance of receiving the content as I’ve been let down in the past and it creates unnecessary extra work. If accepted, your story/ies will be listed below and on the Flash Fiction Fridays page.

POSTED (click on the green ‘batch’ links to read the stories):
SCHEDULED:
  • FFF 193. The forty-fourth batch of 6-word stories by Chong Teck SIM, Mark K, yours trulyand you could have your 6-word stories included here (26th May). The deadline is 24th May.
  • FFF 196. The forty-fifth batch of 6-word stories by Chong Teck SIM, Mark K, yours trulyand you could have your 6-word stories included here (30th June). The deadline is 28th June.
  • FFF 199. The forty-sixth batch of 6-word stories by Chong Teck SIM, Mark K, yours trulyand you could have your 6-word stories included here (28th July). The deadline is 26th July.
  • FFF 202. The forty-seventh batch of 6-word stories by Chong Teck SIM, Mark K, yours trulyand you could have your 6-word stories included here (25th August). The deadline is 23rd August.
  • and so on…
Thank you and I look forward to receiving your submissions for this, the <500-word Flash Fiction Fridays, and the 100-word competition entries.
Morgen
(with an e)