Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast – short stories episode no.13

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast ‘short stories’ episode number 13 went live today.

I’ve been starting off the first few weeks with the flash fiction that have appeared on my blog as ‘Flash Fiction Fridays’, reading out three per fortnight. Do email me should you like to submit your own.

This episode contained three stories: Revenge is a dish best served… alive (701 words) by Christopher Farley, AJ Kirby’s I dream of violence (500 words) and Dreams (210 words) by JD Mader.

See the links above to read the stories… or hear my dulcet tones on the podcast by clicking on any of the following… iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

The authors…

Christopher Farley.  He lived a sheltered life in the wilds of Kent from where he was saved by the written word.  So much so that he still corresponds with certain people with A PEN AND PAPER!!

Upon moving to London, a bit like Dick Whittington, searching for streets of gold, he happened upon a beautiful Italian lady who later decided to take him to the sunny realm of southern Switzerland, where he can still be found, smiling inanely, continuously in search of Weissbier.

When he is not working or drinking he sits in front of the computer, searching for fictional inspiration. You can find Chris via his blog http://talkingtosh.wordpress.com where he says he longs to make a living writing but…

AJ Kirby is the award-winning author of five novels (Paint this town Red, 2012; Perfect World, 2011; Bully, 2009; The Magpie Trap, 2008; When Elephants Walk through the Gorbals, 2007), two novellas (The Black Book, 2011; and Call of the Sea, 2010), one novelette (Bed Peace, 2011) and over forty published short stories.

He is also a sportswriter for the Professional Footballers’ Association and a reviewer for The Short Review and The New York Journal of Books.

You can reach him via his: Author website, Goodreads Author Page, Amazon Author Page, New York Journal of Books and Facebook Novel Home Page.

JD Mader is a teacher and writer / musician based in San Francisco. He has been fortunate enough to encounter many giving and inspiring people in his life. He hopes to repay the debt. And to make enough money with his writing to buy a house.

His website is http://www.jdmader.com where you can read more of JD’s writing and if you’d like more (and why wouldn’t you?) his first novel Joe Café, second, The Biker, and collaboration ‘Bad Book’ (with Hise and Brooks) are available from Amazon. He’s also just released a collection of short stories Please, no eyes which I have purchased (at the grand sum of £0.77!) and shall be reviewing for my Short Story Saturdays slot.

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Thank you for downloading / listening to this short story episode – I hope you enjoyed it. The next episode will be a hints & tips episode then short stories return a fortnight thereafter.

All the details of these episodes are listed on the podcast page of this blog and my email address to submit a short story for critique (or review for the Short Story Saturdays) is morgen@morgenbailey.com.

The podcast is available via iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast – short stories no.11

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast ‘short stories’ episode number 11 went live today.

I’ve been starting off the first few weeks with the flash fiction that have appeared on my blog as ‘Flash Fiction Fridays’, reading out three per fortnight. Do email me (morgen@morgenbailey.com) should you like to submit your own.

This episode contained four stories: ‘The Jazz and the Blues’ a 713-worder by Mia Johansson, two 99-worders entitled ‘Taken’ and ‘Mother of the Bride’ by AJ Kirby and a 614-worder called ‘The Ticket’ by Carrie King.

Mia Johansson is a civil engineer living in Sweden, author of the fiction novel “Unfinished discussion about God – The diary of a time traveller” expected to be published 2012, and other short stories.

She is an occasional photographer interested in the architecture of old and modern cities, street life, a good cup of coffee and jazz.

You can view her stunningly attractive albums here.

AJ Kirby is the award-winning author of five novels (Paint this town Red, 2012; Perfect World, 2011; Bully, 2009; The Magpie Trap, 2008; When Elephants Walk through the Gorbals, 2007), two novellas (The Black Book, 2011; and Call of the Sea, 2010), one novelette (Bed Peace, 2011) and over forty published short stories.

He is also a sportswriter for the Professional Footballers’ Association and a reviewer for The Short Review and The New York Journal of Books. He will return with more flash fiction on 25th May. 🙂 You can reach him via: Author website, Goodreads Author Page, Amazon Author Page, New York Journal of Books and Facebook Novel Home Page.

Carrie King was born in the tiny hamlet of Sharpenhoe in Bedfordshire, England, which sits beneath a small hill, smothered in trees, known as The Clappers, nestled on the edge of the Chilterns. To any Reader of The Life in the Wood with Joni-Pip, that might sound a tad familiar!

She was the seventh of eight children, placed between her youngest brother, David and older sister, Sylvia. When she was eight, her family moved to another tiny hamlet in Bedfordshire called Bidwell. She so missed the woods and the hills.

Carrie was educated in Dunstable, Bedfordshire and loved school. English, Art and French were her favourite subjects but she decided to become a doctor! However, this didn’t happen, as she fell in love and was married at nineteen. Being a wife and the mother of three daughters, became her full-time career.

She began to write for television, encouraged by Christopher Walker, Head of Drama for Central Television and Pam Francis, Journalist for the Independent, and you can find Carrie’s website at http://joni-pip.com.

Thank you for downloading / listening to this short story episode – I hope you enjoyed it. The next episode (in a fortnight) will be a hints & tips episode (unless anyone’s brave enough to email me their short story for critique) then short stories return a fortnight thereafter.

All the details of these episodes are listed on the podcast page of this blog and my email address to submit a short story for critique (or review for the Short Story Saturdays) is morgen@morgenbailey.com.

The podcast is available via iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum and you can follow me on Twitter, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 2,000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Flash Fiction Friday 036: I Dream of Violence by AJ Kirby

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the thirty-sixth piece of flash fiction in this series. This week’s is a 500-worder entitled ‘I Dream of Violence’ by horror, crime, thriller author, interviewee and spotlightee AJ Kirby.

I Dream of Violence

Eight years old and only just grown out of Transformers tee shirts, but still rather enamoured with waist-coats in the style of Han Solo in Star Wars, my mum and dad sat me down at the breakfast bar one day in front their big Ban the Bomb poster. Said they had something important to tell me. Something to do with why I’d kept getting ill recently. Something to do with why they hadn’t let me play out a while.

They told me I was going to hospital.

It wasn’t so much the operation that worried me (after all, I’d played Operation many times and was fairly confident I could handle all that stuff) but the being away from home thing. What if I wet the bed?

Dad must have spotted my worry and, feeling guilty, he offered me a bribe. A present. Mum shot him a fierce look but said nothing.

I thought he’d forgotten, but he said the same thing when I was in the hospital bed under those sheets pulled so tight I couldn’t kick my legs.

‘Choose anything you want,’ he said, reaching over the bed and touching my arm. I noticed the twitch as his hand brushed past the drip which was embedded in me.

‘I want a cap-gun,’ I said, knowing that my predicament put me in an excellent bargaining position.

A look of unspoken disappointment passed between my parents then. My mum’s eyes chastised my father for his neglect to install a proper clause in his promise which would disallow weaponry of any description.

‘In the morning,’ they said, back home. ‘All good things come to those who wait.’

But in the morning, woozy in my just-changed bedsheets, there was still no sign of my cap gun. And when they came to pick me up, the thing dad was holding behind his back wasn’t a gun at all, but my sister. She was hiding from me because I smelled hospital-weird, she said.

Perhaps they hoped that in time I would forget, but for a young boy brought up in a house with no instruments of violence, guns had become my holy grail. I don’t think they properly understood my determination to be Han Solo blasting Greedo, my love of the bomb they wanted banned.

Over breakfast, it was all looming silence over the wholemeal toast and uneasy passing of the low fat butter between my parents. In the end, it was left to my mum to explain. ‘A little boy blinded himself with one of those cap-guns. It was on the news. I’m sorry, David, but we can’t let you have your present. You can choose anything else though.’

And in that moment, full of childish wisdom, I was certain that mum had been the one that had blinded the boy. She was, I knew, full of more cold, hard will to win than even the toughest military men. She had intervened, done whatever it took to keep her boy from having a gun.

That was great, thank you AJ.

AJ Kirby is the award-winning author of five novels (Paint this town Red, 2012; Perfect World, 2011; Bully, 2009; The Magpie Trap, 2008; When Elephants Walk through the Gorbals, 2007), two novellas (The Black Book, 2011; and Call of the Sea, 2010), one novelette (Bed Peace, 2011) and over forty published short stories.

He is also a sportswriter for the Professional Footballers’ Association and a reviewer for The Short Review and The New York Journal of Books.

You can reach him via his: Author website, Goodreads Author Page, Amazon Author Page, New York Journal of Books and Facebook Novel Home Page.

If you’d like to submit your 1,000-word max. stories for consideration for Flash Fiction Friday take a look here.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with urban fantasy author and artist Shonna White – the three hundred and eighty-first of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum and you can follow me on Twitter, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Free eBook on Kindle: AJ Kirby’s ‘Bully’

Regular contributor to this blog is horror writer (and author of other genres) and interviewee AJ Kirby, and I’m delighted to say that one of his Kindle novels is currently available to download for free.

AJ Kirby is the award-winning author of five novels (Paint this town Red, 2012; Perfect World, 2011; Bully, 2009; The Magpie Trap, 2008; When Elephants Walk through the Gorbals, 2007), two novellas (The Black Book, 2011; and Call of the Sea, 2010), one novelette (Bed Peace, 2011) and over forty published short stories (some of which have appeared on this blog’s Flash Fiction Fridays). He is also a sportswriter for the Professional Footballers’ Association and a reviewer for The Short Review and The New York Journal of Books.

It’s is the aforementioned ‘Bully’ that is available as a free eBook and here are a few words to entice you further…

They say you should never go back. But sometimes you don’t have a choice.
After Gary Bull’s miraculous survival from an explosion in Afghanistan, he is compelled to return to the small town where he grew up, a place that he thought he would never set his eyes upon again. Memories of a past long buried come back to him and he finds himself forced to face the horror of what he did when he was young. It started with the bullying…

Newton Mills appears normal enough on the surface, but scratch the surface and there is something far more sinister.

It has more than its fair share of graveyards and the skeletons are liable to walk right out of the closet.

Newton Mills is the scene of a despicable crime.

No one gets out alive. 

The reviews received for ‘Bully’ so far have been 5*, with one comparing AJ to Harris (Thomas, presumably) and King (I’d say Stephen). 🙂

It is available for a limited time only on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.

I’ve downloaded it and look forward to reading it. If you do download it and read it, please do leave AJ a review – reviews mean the world to us authors. 🙂