Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast – short stories episode no.17

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast ‘short stories’ episode number 17 went live today and contained three flash fiction pieces that have appeared on my blog as Flash Fiction Fridays. Do email me should you like to submit your own.

This episode contained: Three pieces by non-fiction author, autobiographer and interviewee Abbie LipschutzCafe Mort (716 words) by prose author, poet, lyricist and interviewee Nathan Weaver (you may need to forgive my French accent in that one) and Autumn preserves (122 words) by short story author and poet Susan Moffat.

See the green links above to read the stories… or hear my dulcet tones on the podcast, which is available via iTunesGoogle’s FeedburnerPodbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

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For nine decades, Abbie Lipschutz has been a fighter, lover, writer, dilettante musician and classical music commentator. He is a clinically happy soul who possesses Offensive Charm and Unjustified Arrogance, qualities that have served him well over the years. He was a kibbutznik in Palestine in the early 40s, a veteran of the Dutch Prinses Irene Brigade in World War II, and a volunteer in Israel’s War of Independence, 1948-1949. By then he had long lost his beliefs in the Zionist-Socialist dreams. Nonetheless, he joined, feeling that 2000 years of persecution had been enough.

Having made a living for 50 years as a wholesale diamond peddler throughout the American South, he discovered the vastness of our land, its Big Sky and its multi-colored characters. He ended his diamond career in 1999 after being held up at gunpoint. Seeing van Gogh’s painting, “The Potato Eaters,” at age 14 changed his life by turning him into a political radical, which he has still remained. Thoreau’s phrase, “Most men live lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them,” confirmed what van Gogh’s painting had conveyed to him years before. Husband, father, and grandfather, he has written a memoir filled with the sights, sounds, scents, songs and surprises of a soulful, vigorous life well-lived. His book connects the generations in one grand sweep of hope, love, and peace. Abbie’s website is http://www.abbielipschutz.com and you can watch his video at http://youtu.be/C-xpHaz2P3s.

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Nathan Weaver has been writing for roughly 15 years, though badly in the beginning, and focusing on short stories, novellas and screenplays. He has recently been honing his craft towards writing novels, completing a draft of his first novel in summer 2011, which is the beginning of a series of crime novels set in a high school setting and titled Hardboil High.

Aside from storytelling, he is an independent filmmaker and lyricist for Blue Solace. You can read a lot of his shorter works and excerpts from longer ones, for free, at his blog Tales from Babylon, and you can find this event on his http://talesfrombabylon.fanbridge.com/tourdates page.

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Born in 1969, Susan Moffat grew up in County Durham, in the North East of England, during the period of the Miner’s Strike, mass unemployment and the very beginning of the technological boom.

She studied Computer Studies in the late 80’s, and worked in IT for a book distribution company for almost 10 years, before taking time out to become a mother. She now works part time as a librarian in a Special Needs Secondary School.

In 2010 she started a degree course in creative writing and film and TV sceenwriting.

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Thank you for downloading / listening to this short story episode – I hope you enjoyed it. The next episode will be a hints & tips episode in a fortnight, then short stories return a fortnight thereafter.

All the details of these episodes are listed on this blog’s Podcast Short Stories page and my email address to submit a short story for critique (or review for the Short Story Saturdays) is morgen@morgenbailey.com.

The podcast is available via iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books and I also have a blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast – short stories episode no.13

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast ‘short stories’ episode number 13 went live today.

I’ve been starting off the first few weeks with the flash fiction that have appeared on my blog as ‘Flash Fiction Fridays’, reading out three per fortnight. Do email me should you like to submit your own.

This episode contained three stories: Revenge is a dish best served… alive (701 words) by Christopher Farley, AJ Kirby’s I dream of violence (500 words) and Dreams (210 words) by JD Mader.

See the links above to read the stories… or hear my dulcet tones on the podcast by clicking on any of the following… iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

The authors…

Christopher Farley.  He lived a sheltered life in the wilds of Kent from where he was saved by the written word.  So much so that he still corresponds with certain people with A PEN AND PAPER!!

Upon moving to London, a bit like Dick Whittington, searching for streets of gold, he happened upon a beautiful Italian lady who later decided to take him to the sunny realm of southern Switzerland, where he can still be found, smiling inanely, continuously in search of Weissbier.

When he is not working or drinking he sits in front of the computer, searching for fictional inspiration. You can find Chris via his blog http://talkingtosh.wordpress.com where he says he longs to make a living writing but…

AJ Kirby is the award-winning author of five novels (Paint this town Red, 2012; Perfect World, 2011; Bully, 2009; The Magpie Trap, 2008; When Elephants Walk through the Gorbals, 2007), two novellas (The Black Book, 2011; and Call of the Sea, 2010), one novelette (Bed Peace, 2011) and over forty published short stories.

He is also a sportswriter for the Professional Footballers’ Association and a reviewer for The Short Review and The New York Journal of Books.

You can reach him via his: Author website, Goodreads Author Page, Amazon Author Page, New York Journal of Books and Facebook Novel Home Page.

JD Mader is a teacher and writer / musician based in San Francisco. He has been fortunate enough to encounter many giving and inspiring people in his life. He hopes to repay the debt. And to make enough money with his writing to buy a house.

His website is http://www.jdmader.com where you can read more of JD’s writing and if you’d like more (and why wouldn’t you?) his first novel Joe Café, second, The Biker, and collaboration ‘Bad Book’ (with Hise and Brooks) are available from Amazon. He’s also just released a collection of short stories Please, no eyes which I have purchased (at the grand sum of £0.77!) and shall be reviewing for my Short Story Saturdays slot.

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Thank you for downloading / listening to this short story episode – I hope you enjoyed it. The next episode will be a hints & tips episode then short stories return a fortnight thereafter.

All the details of these episodes are listed on the podcast page of this blog and my email address to submit a short story for critique (or review for the Short Story Saturdays) is morgen@morgenbailey.com.

The podcast is available via iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast – short stories episode no.12

Bailey’s Writing Tips podcast ‘short stories’ episode number twelve went live today, Monday 18th June.

I’ve been starting off the first few weeks with the flash fiction that have appeared on my blog as ‘Flash Fiction Fridays’, reading out three per fortnight. Do email me (morgen@morgenbailey.com) should you like to submit your own. The podcast is available via iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

This episode’s were Bowed out (742 words) by novelist and short story author Marc Nash, Hachette (582 words) by comic fantasy (“and a little horror”) author Will Macmillan-Jones and Over by me, Morgen Bailey.

See the links above to read the stories… or hear my dulcet tones on the podcast.

Marc Nash is London born, bred and resident. He says he’s always resorted to the written word, thinking himself an observer by temperament. After a brief adolescent delusion that he could write lyrics, he passed over into writing stage plays for 10 years from University onwards and then when his twin boys arrived in the world meaning he couldn’t really hang around theatre bars at night, he tried his hand at prose fiction. His blog is www.sulcicollective.blogspot.com, he’s @21stCscribe on Twitter and is very active there. He has a couple of websites on the novels, http://marcnash.weebly.com and http://marcnashNIMN.weebly.com as well as a YouTube channel with 17 literature related videos (just type in sulci collective into the search function).

Will is a fifty-something lover of blues, rock and jazz. He presently lives in South Wales, and has just fulfilled a lifetime ambition by extending his bookcases to fill one entire wall of his home office. Working as a professional tax consultant, he writes to escape the stultifying boredom of his job. He has an irregular blog, www.willmacmillanjones.wordpress.com where he “rambles incoherently about writing” and he can also be found at www.thebannedunderground.weebly.com.

I’m Morgen With An E, a writer of over 7 years (although I do remember writing a story about an ampersand when young and dabbling with limericks in my 20s, although I’ve always had my head in a book; formerly Stephen King but my tastes have softened somewhat… to crime and humour). I’m passionate about the craft, and wanted to share with you my knowledge and experience gleaned to-date, having studied under the tutorledge of Sally Spedding, Judith AllnattSue Moorcroft, Joanna Barnden, Jane Adams, and Myra Schneider, amongst many others (I love going to workshops and conferences) and most recently Helen M Hunt. I write fiction, mainly short stories and novels with some poetry, and have been published in the UK, and rejected in the UK and overseas. I’ve written four and a bit novels (three for NaNoWriMo) and the ‘bit’ is a conversion of my Script Frenzy 2010 script which I’ll continue at some stage. I post three to four items a day here (including interviews, guest blogs, author spotlights, flash fiction and poetry), have eBooks on Amazon and Smashwords including free eShort stories, the $0.99 Story a Day May 2011 collection I mentioned earlier and a 1,000 sentence start writer’s block workbook (which also includes over 50 weekly tips), again on Smashwords for $0.99.

 

Thank you for downloading / listening to this short story episode – I hope you enjoyed it. The next episode will be a hints & tips episode in a fortnight (when I’ll be talking about eBooks) then the short stories return a fortnight thereafter.

All the details of these episodes are listed on the podcast page of this blog and my email address to submit a short story for critique (or reviews for the Short Story Saturdays, mentioned below) is morgen@morgenbailey.com.

The podcast itself is available via iTunes, Google’s Feedburner, Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Guest post: ‘Setting up a spoken word website’ by Rachel Cochrane

I’m delighted to bring you this guest blog post, today by Listen Up North’s Rachel Cochrane.

Setting up listenupnorth.com a spoken word entertainment website

Ten years ago I gave up a professional post in the NHS to realise my ambition to become a scriptwriter. Many years and countless rejections later, I was determined that the next thing I wrote was going to find an audience.  This decision coincided with the advent of digital media and for the past year I have been setting up spoken word entertainment website listenupnorth.com showcasing my own and other writers’ work.  Visitors to the site can listen online or via downloads to radio plays, short stories, poetry and book extracts.

Having built up content and a following, I am now exploring ways of monetising the site to make it a viable concern including advertising and sponsorship. I would like to share with you 10 things I have learnt along the way:

  1. Be prepared to be out of your comfort zone – I am not the world’s most outgoing or confident person but to achieve what I want I have had learn to fight my corner, become self-assured about what I am doing and shout it from the roof tops.
  2. Take responsibility – You have to be the driving force that ensures that your project is on course and comes to fruition.
  3. Networking – Many writers spend solitary lives avoiding communication with others!  You need people that can help you build and support what you are trying to do both creatively and as a business venture. Find network groups that are not just other writers.
  4. Numbers matter – Not only is it very satisfying to get your work out to an audience but the number of hits and especially subscribers matter when you wish to attract funding, whether from public or private sponsorship or advertising.
  5. Publicity – There are lots of ways that you can raise awareness of your work without spending huge amounts on marketing.  Encourage those involved with your projects to spread the word about what you’re doing. Try a workshop on how to exploit social media for business.  Whom are you trying to attract?  Where can find you find them?  How you can target them? Networks made on social media can pay dividends at this point.  Are there any current topics or issues that your creative work can hook into?  Any blogs posts you can write for other sites? Don’t forget traditional media: a story in the local newspaper, a guest spot on local radio, a talk to local groups in village halls.
  6. Look for opportunities – I undertook a creative entrepreneurship course to learn business skills and then a digital fellowship to develop my digital awareness.  Both these university-based schemes had mentor support.
  7. Be prepared to learn new skills – To make my radio dramas and other recordings, I had to learn about directing (i.e. just stand there and sound like you know what you are doing!), producing and I undertook a course at a local college to learn technical skills such as recording and editing.
  8. Collaboration – Some projects, whether business or creative, are too big to manage alone and this is where networking is invaluable.  Other people may have the skills and knowledge that you need and vice versa.  It is important to establish at the outset the role of each party, what they expect to achieve and any boundaries. At present I am collaborating with another writer on a joint package to attract advertising to support both our businesses.  My soon-to-be-released short film Celia was a joint venture between myself, a producer / director and an actor, each of us looking for a vehicle to showcase our talents. Click here for a link to the trailer for Celia.
  9. Run it as a business – Money should not be a dirty word to creative people! Make sure that what you are doing does not just become an expensive hobby.  Fact: without bringing in money I cannot hope to maintain what I have worked hard to create not only for myself but also for other writers.
  10. Make sure you still find time for your own writing!

Hear hear! Thank you Rachel.

After many years of scriptwriting full-time and several shortlists, Rachel decided to bypass the cumbersome commissioning process and take advantage of the advent of digital media.  After being selected for the Creative GLEAM scheme at Durham University Business School and a DigitalCity Fellowship at the Institute of Digital Innovation, she has now set up a spoken word entertainment website listenupnorth.com, recording her own dramas and inviting other writers to submit their quality work for you to enjoy.  Rachel is about to launch the pilot episode of her webdrama Celia, the deliberations of a middle-class, middle-aged woman which bears no resemblance to her own life – honest.  Catch the trailer http://listenupnorth.com/drama-page/338.

You can find more about Rachel and her work via the links above and you can also find her on Twitter and Facebook. You can also email her at enquiries@listenupnorth.com. I shall be interviewing Rachel later this month but in the meantime you can read her author spotlight.

If you would like to write a writing-related guest post for my blog then feel free to email me with an outline of what you would like to write about. If it’s writing-related then it’s highly likely I’d email back and say “yes please” (while quietly bouncing up and down in my seat with joy!).

The blog interviews return as normal tomorrow morning with novelist Laura-Wilkinson – the one hundred and eighty-ninth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.