RSS

Tag Archives: Crime Writers Association

Guest post: Point of view by Rosemary McCracken

Tonight’s guest blog post, on the topic of point of view is brought to you by journalist, short story author and mystery novelist Rosemary McCracken.

Before you keyboard your opening sentence, you will need to decide on what point of view your novel will take. I didn’t do this when I began Safe Harbor. I plunged into the story, writing it down from the POV of a third-person narrator. For some vague reason, I felt that the use of a first person narrator was way too prevalent in mystery novels, especially those by North American writers. The late Robert B. Parker used it in his Spenser series. Janet Evanovich, Sue Grafton and Sara Paretsky use it. I must say that I like the works of Parker, Evanovich, Grafton and Paretsky, but I was determined to be different.

I completed the first drafts of Safe Harbor in third person, and early in 2009 I entered the manuscript in Britain’s Crime Writers’ Association’s Debut Dagger competition, a contest open to English-language writers around the world who haven’t had a novel published. The CWA never got back to me, which meant, in a competition that attracts hundreds of entries, that I hadn’t made its shortlist.

I went back to Safe Harbor and applied more polish. Later that year, veteran Canadian crime writer Gail Bowen was writer-in-residence at the Toronto Reference Library and she read the first part of the manuscript. “This book needs to be written in the first person,” she said when we met for our discussion. “We need to know what Pat Tierney is thinking and feeling every step along the way.”

I felt like the carpet had been pulled out from under my feet. Safe Harbor is a murder mystery, but it’s also the story of Pat’s personal journey of coming to terms with her husband’s infidelity and getting on with her life. The story’s major events – Jude’s murder and the danger Tommy is in – affect Pat deeply because of her personal involvement in them. Jude was Michael’s mistress. Tommy is Michael’s son and a living reminder of his affair. I needed to get deeper into Pat’s head. And the best way to do that was to let her tell the story.

I rewrote the book in the first person. I knew Pat intimately, so I felt completely comfortable jumping into her shoes. And right from the start, I knew I’d made right choice. I felt an energy emanating from the story that hadn’t been there before. I showed several chapters to members of my writers’ group, and they agreed.

Safe Harbor had been written in the limited third person, a form of narration that lets the reader see events from the POV of a single character or of a few characters at the most. The focal characters in the original drafts were Pat and, to a lesser extent, Farah Alwan, her young housekeeper. Now with Pat as the book’s narrator, Farah’s role is much diminished. It’s limited to what Pat can tell us about her.

Early the next year, I entered the rewrite in the 2010 Debut Dagger competition. Same title (at that time it was Safe Harbour, with the Canadian and British spelling of Harbour; it was changed to the American spelling when the novel was released by Imajin Books), same story line as my previous submission, but this time told in the first person. That year Safe Harbor emerged as one of 11 novels – out of about 1,100 submissions from around the world – that were shortlisted for the award. I was astonished…and overjoyed. Being on that shortlist has been one of the highlights of my life.

I believe the intimacy created by the first-person narrator made all the difference in attracting the judges’ attention. I’ve learned that every standalone novel and every series demands a certain point of view, depending how far the writer needs to get inside certain characters’ heads. If you’re uncertain which to use at the outset, I suggest you write versions of your opening chapters from different points of view and settle on the one that is most comfortable for you as a writer and the most effective for your story.

Thank you, Rosemary, and congratulations!

Born and raised in Montreal, Rosemary McCracken has worked on newspapers across Canada as a reporter, arts writer and reviewer, and editor. She is now a Toronto-based freelance journalist, specializing in personal finance and the financial services industry.

Rosemary’s short fiction has been published by Room of One’s Own Press and Kaleidoscope Books. Her first mystery novel, Safe Harbor, was shortlisted for Britain’s Crime Writers’ Association’s Debut Dagger Award in 2010. It was released by Imajin Books this spring, and is available as an ebook and a paperback on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk. Visit Rosemary on her website and her blog.

Synopsis, Safe Harbor

Safe Harbor opens when a frightened woman barges into financial planner Pat Tierney’s office with a shocking request: “Look after my boy; he’s your late husband’s son.” The next day the woman is murdered and police say the seven-year-old may be the killer’s next target. In a desperate race to protect Tommy, Pat’s searches for the truth and uncovers a deadly scheme involving illegal immigrants, trafficking in human body parts and money laundering.

***

If you would like to write a writing-related guest post for my blog then feel free to email me with an outline of what you would like to write about. If it’s writing-related then it’s highly likely I’d email back and say “yes please”.

The blog interviews return as normal tomorrow morning with non-fiction author Marlene Caroselli – the four hundred and seventy-sixth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me. I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on August 28, 2012 in ebooks, ideas, novels, tips, viewpoints, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Interview no.402 with Hersilia Press publisher Ilaria Meliconi

Welcome to the four hundred and second of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. Today’s is with Hersilia Press publisher Ilaria Meliconi. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further.

Morgen: Hello, Ilaria. Can you please briefly explain the structure of your publishing house… perhaps who’s involved along the process of an acceptance to the book / story being published.

Ilaria: I publish Italian crime fiction including translations of books by Italian authors and English books set in Italy. I’m the publisher and owner, so I am the person who looks for new books to publish and makes the final decision on whether to make an offer for the rights acquisition. For translations, when I find a suitable book I send a copy to readers, who are fluent Italian speakers living in the UK, and they give me their opinion on it. On the basis of their reports and my own judgement I then make a decision on whether to make an offer for the translation rights. For English manuscripts I usually work with agents (meaning the manuscript has already had a first round of editing) but may suggest some further structural editing. All manuscripts are copyedited before being published.

Morgen: Now I wish I spoke Italian, it’s sounds a great process to be involved in (hard work of course but…). The $64,000 question: out of all the submissions you receive, what makes a book / story stand out for all the right reasons?

Ilaria: Good writing is essential, and I really don’t like big words used for their own sake and affectation. It is rarely appropriate to the crime genre and if an author can’t use different styles in different genres then that’s something they have to work on.

I like an unusual story that makes me believe I know what happened and it turns out it was something else, and a story where the explanation of some event or behaviour is not obvious. A good crime story doesn’t need a troubled, alcoholic and divorced detective to work, but it can work even without a professional detective. What makes people snap and kill others in a particular situation is fascinating to investigate.

Morgen: And then be an ultimate page-turner. Without naming names, what makes a book proposal / story stand out for all the wrong reasons? 🙂

Ilaria: Stories that follow a fad, Templar knights mysteries and unoriginal titles that copy other, more famous ones.

Morgen: And possibly better written. How can an author submit to you?

Ilaria: Just email a book synopsis and the first chapter to submissions@hersilia-press.co.uk, with a short paragraph about yourself.

Morgen: Can you suggest some do’s and don’t’s when submitting to you.

Ilaria: Do write the submission as if you were applying for a job, not writing to your sister. Use paragraphs and don’t use text speak in the submission, even if it’s an email. Do read the information on my website before sending a submission. Don’t email me submissions for genres I don’t publish. Don’t ask for advice on how to get published, or a free publishing consultation – you wouldn’t ask your electrician to work for free!

Morgen: Common sense, you would hope. To your knowledge, have any of your published books / stories won or been shortlisted in any competitions?

Ilaria: I try to select good quality books so many of them have won or been shortlisted in competitions.

The first two books in the Commissario Cataldo series by Luigi Guicciardi have been shortlisted for the Premio Scerbanenco, Blood Sisters by Alessandro Perissinotto has won the Premio Grinzane Cavour in 2005 and the Premio Camaiore in 2006.

Maurizio de Giovanni, author of I Will Have Vengeance, has won the Premio Camaiore in 2011 and has been shortlisted for the prestigious Premio Scerbanenco in 2010; it has also been shortlisted for the CWA Ellis Peters Award for historical crime fiction and the CWA International Dagger for translated novels.

Morgen: That’s fantastic. I don’t know the aforementioned Italian awards (sorry about that) but the CWA (Crime Writers Association) is highly respected here.

What do you feel about an author writing under a pseudonym? Do you think they make a difference to their profile? And would you recommend an author writing under different names for different genres?

Ilaria: I do. When an author writes in more than one genre, it helps readers identify what type of book they are looking at, even if the external layout should be clear enough. It might also help an author get “into character” when writing.

Morgen: I’d not thought of it like that, the ‘getting into character’. Quite a few household names write under pseudonyms for their different styles, Ruth Rendell = Barbara Vine, Joanna Trollope = Caroline Harvey to name a couple. Another semi-priceless question: do you think an agent is vital to an author’s success? How would you suggest an author gets one?

Ilaria: It’s vital that a manuscript is professionally edited – and having an agent reassures a publisher this has been done. If you can have your manuscript professionally edited (not just read by a friend or relative who likes books) and don’t have an agent, some of the work has been done but it is still more difficult to place it with a publisher. Lot of publishers don’t accept manuscripts from unagented authors.

Morgen: I’ve learned from this blog how many authors there are out there and most are trying, or have tried to get an agent or publisher but we all know it’s the profession for testing your determination. 🙂 Now for, in theory, a simple question: what’s your opinion of eBooks, do you publish them and do you read them?

Ilaria: I publish them and read them, and love them! I believe eBooks and paper books can easily coexist.

Morgen: Oh, so do I. Most of the authors I’ve spoken to read both and can’t imagine being without them. Like me, they read paper at home but love the fact that they can have hundreds of titles with them if they go away.

Ilaria: eBooks focus solely on the content, p-books are visual and tactile objects so the physical experience is also important (e.g paper weight and colour, cover). Almost all my submissions are read on an eBook reader. The most important next step for the technology is to become standardised and more reliable: at present, even the same file isn’t rendered in the same way in all eBook devices. This is something that technology companies have to work on. And in my opinion DRM will have to be linked to a digital signature, allowing people to read the book they have legally bought onto as many platforms as they like and own (e.g. eBook reader, mobile phone, computer screen).

Morgen: It’s certainly a learning curve. I held a 2-hour talk at one of my writing groups on Thursday evening about creating eBooks (with a 9-page handout) and even those with little computer knowledge were less daunted by it (although most said they’d like to bribe me with cups of tea and biscuits to go to their houses when they come to put their eBooks together). Poetry and short stories are, in my opinion anyway, the two most hard done by genres… what do you see as the future for them? Do you think the eBook revolution will help given that eBooks seem to be getting shorter?

Ilaria: I think there has been a revival of the short story. A number of publishers are taking advantage of the e-format and are publishing free short stories on their website (Hersilia Press included). There has also been a huge growth in flash fiction which I like very much. Flash fiction is probably among of the hardest type of writing, it needs a lot of work and a lot of honing down to the very essential: it is the best way of showing not telling, where you can let your reader imagine most of the story.

Morgen: I’ve been writing a story a day since May 1st (for Story A Day May then 5pm fiction, as well as one a week for Tuesday Tales) and because of the timing (or lack thereof), they’ve turned out to be flash fiction so it’s what’s coming out at the moment, but I love them so… Apart from the stories in your publications, what do you like to read? Any authors (including those you’ve published) that you’d like to recommend?

Ilaria: I try to read something very different just to switch my brain off crime fiction, so I turn to popular science and academic essays – my training is in science so a part of me wishes to keep up with the recent research (but I don’t usually succeed).

Morgen: But presumably science comes in really handy with the technical side of crime writing. Are you involved in anything else writing-related?

Ilaria: Yes, I help running a writing group called Group 2012, with Blackwell’s bookshop in Oxford and The Oxford Editors. It started in January 2012 and it’s gone from strength to strength: we have a fantastic group of writers. We meet once a month, and usually have an author talking to us about their experience, while in the second half of the meeting we concentrate on writing, with exercises and manuscript feedback. Have a look at www.group2012.wordpress.com.

Morgen: I have, and sadly your group clashes with one I belong to (Towcester Writers Group), the third Wednesday of the month. 😦 I’m not long back from volunteering near you actually, at the first Chipping Norton Literature Festival. I was in the green room part of the time which was fantastic. I hope to be involved again next year (and others in between). 🙂 What do you do when you’re not working?

Ilaria: I like to cook and eat, and do manual things to try to use the other parts of my brain: gardening and pottery (with rather poor results in both).

Morgen: Oh dear. We’ve had a lot of warm and wet weather here in the UK so the garden’s bound to get out of hand (that’s the excuse I’m using anyway). Well, thank you so much Ilaria, lovely to ‘meet’ you today.

Ilaria Meliconi studied astrophysics at the University of Bologna, then an MSc and a DPhil (or a PhD for non-Oxonians) in history of science at Oxford. She fell into publishing, working first on the journal of a learned society and then moving on to managing various journals and commissioning books. After a decade of experience she wanted to recommend her favourite crime fiction books to her English-speaking friends, and found they were not available yet, so decided to do it herself and founded Hersilia Press.

***

If you are reading this and you write, in whatever genre, and are thinking “ooh, I’d like to do this” then you can… just email me and I’ll send you the information. They do now (January 2013) carry a fee (£10 / €12.50 / $15) for the new interviews on this blog but everything else (see Opportunities on this blog) is free.

If you go for the interview, it’s very simple; I send you a questionnaire (I have them for novelists, short story authors, children’s authors, non-fiction authors, and poets). You complete the questions, and I let you know when it’s going to go live. Before it does so, I add in comments as if we’re chatting, and then they get posted. When that’s done, I email you with the link so you can share it with your corner of the literary world. And if you have a writing-related blog / podcast and would like to interview me… let me know.

Alternatively, if you’d like a free Q&A-only interview, I now have http://morgensauthorinterviews.wordpress.com on which I’ve rerun the original interviews posted here then posted new interviews which I then reblog here. These interviews are Q&A only, so I don’t add in my comments but they do get exposure on both sites.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel, which is being serialised on Novel Nights In!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers. If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating and choose an optional free eBook.

For writers / readers willing to give feedback and / or writers wanting feedback, take a look at this blog’s Feedback page.

As I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t unfortunately review books but I have a list of those who do. I welcome critique for the four new writing groups listed below and / or flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays. For other opportunities see (see Opportunities on this blog).

The full details of the new online writing groups, and their associated Facebook groups, are:

Morgen’s Online Non-Fiction Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Novel Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Poetry Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Script Writing Group

Morgen’s Online Short Story Writing Group

We look forward to reading your comments.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on June 16, 2012 in ebooks, interview, novels, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Guest post: They Like Me, They Really Like Me by Catherine Astolfo

Tonight’s guest blog post, on the topic of awards and prizes is brought to you by Catherine Astolfo.

Just recently (April 19 in fact), I was thrilled to hear my name read out as a finalist for the Short Story category of a major award in my country. Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) presents awards for excellence in mystery writing, named after Canada’s first hangman, Arthur Ellis. The Arthur Ellis Awards have acknowledged distinction in Canadian crime writing for 29 years. They draw readers’ and critics’ attention to excellent work in the field. A good friend of mine says the main honor for her would be that a jury of peers has judged your writing and found it commendable.  I wasn’t able to articulate what it meant for me. I think I was still in shock.

Grateful, humbled, excited and happy are the emotions I felt, and still feel, as the award ceremony (May 31) approaches. I began to think about awards in general, probably as a distraction from obsessing over decision day.

A few years ago, a team commissioned by CWC applied for a grant to research awards in terms of their impact. Loosely, the question was: does being nominated for / winning an award make a positive difference to the shortlisted / winner’s writing career? Unfortunately, the grant application was unsuccessful. Therefore we have very little hard data here in Canada, at least for our genre of crime writing.

In honor of distraction, therefore, I conducted some very unscientific searches on the Internet. It has kept me busy, but of course no one would write a thesis based on the results.

Around the world, it appears there are mixed reviews on the after-effects. In the United States, The National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize have been proven to cause very significant jumps in sales. There are many examples on the web of authors and publishers who have acquired financial success and fame (or more of those) by winning these awards.

Lots of news media and publishers report that the prestige of the award and the cash prize (if there is one) are outweighed by the drive upwards in sales. The Man Booker Prize (from the UK) seems to pretty much guarantee that its winner will gain worldwide readership along with the resultant dramatic increase in book sales.

The Independent Book Publisher Awards (IPBA), in their paper, Using Book Awards to Boost Your Book Sales, states that awards boost credibility, buzz, and garner more reviews and interviews. “The fact is, award stickers help to convince buyers to purchase,” said Jim Cox, Midwest Book Review, in a quote for the treatise. He cites librarians as an example of a large group influenced by awards. There’s an approval factor involved. The Saskatoon Book Awards in Canada mentions increased publicity, readership, and sales as benefits.

In New Zealand, George Walker, a publisher for Reed and Penguin, is more neutral about the impact of winning awards. I read an article in which he said, “Sometimes it does [increase sales], sometimes it doesn’t; you have to ask ‘has the book the potential to be a large seller?’” By bestseller he means, does it have mass appeal? How long has it been around before the award? I interpreted his stance this way: there are lots of other factors that might influence the impact on the sales numbers.

I was aware before my little search that there are huge differences in the prestige and cash prize amounts all over the world.  But then I began to wonder. Does the cash prize amount affect the status of the award? Is that a chicken and egg question? Or is it irrelevant?

I did a very quick survey of the prizes involved. The National Book Award gives $10,000 US to the winner. So does the Pulitzer (except in the journalism category). The Man Booker Award gets the winner sixty thousand pounds (over $96,000 for us Canucks). The grandparent of all, the Nobel Prize, grants over a million and a half Canadian bucks, The Dublin (Ireland) Literary Awards $139,000, our Writers’ Trust Award (for non-fiction) $60,000 and our Scotiabank Giller prize is worth $50,000. In the latter case, one study I found actually did research and proved that the “Giller effect” does, in fact, increase sales in a very lucrative way for the Canadian authors who’d won it.

In the mystery genre, the Edgar, Hammet and Nero Wolfe Awards provide no cash, but they have a significant amount of caché nonetheless.  The Crime Writers Association of Britain gives away fifty thousand pounds. The Arthur Ellis Awards do give some cash prizes, but the amounts are fairly small.

Unfortunately, I haven’t seen any studies that investigate whether or not there is a correlation between the amount of the cash prize and its impact on book sales. Have you? Or maybe it’s only my warped mind, thinking there might be a relationship. Does money equal status and vice versa or not? Does status therefore equate to book sales (and circle back to money again)? Or, as George Walker says, there are too many other factors to consider.

So there must be other reasons to give awards.  Canada’s Parliamentary Committee on the Book Publishing Industry a few years ago stated that: “…the arts may for many represent a profound fusion of needs for belonging, affection and self-expression.” If that’s true, then winning an award meets those needs at a very high level, I would think. Even being nominated for one would do it. The IPBA gives “it feels good” as one of the main reasons for being thrilled at winning or being a finalist for an award.

I’d love to know if there are any others out there looking for distraction. Have you discovered any research on the impact of awards on a writing career? Any correlation with the amount of the prize? Have you won an award? How did it reflect on your own book sales? Or did you care: the feelings of honor and “they like me, they really like me” being enough?

My wins have been really small (double figures) but thrilling and something for the CV. As you say it’s proof that someone who means something likes my work. 🙂 Thank you, Catherine!

Catherine Astolfo retired from education to pursue her true passion: writing.  She self-published a novel series, The Emily Taylor Mysteries, that revolved around an unusual heroine—the principal of an elementary school.  In her late forties, Emily Taylor becomes a reluctant sleuth through a variety of external events. Some of her decisions, however, are based on a fear of discovery, for she has a mysterious past that involves her husband.  Readers do not find out the details of this past life until Book 4.

In 2011, Catherine acquired a four-book contract from Imajin Books for the e-versions and paperbacks of the series. Her short stories have won the Bony Pete and she is an Arthur Ellis Award nominee in that category.

Catherine was the 2010-11 President of Crime Writers of Canada and is a member of Sisters in Crime Toronto. Check her out at www.catherineastolfo.com.

The Bridgeman is the first book in the Emily Taylor Mysteries.

Discovering the murdered body of her caretaker horrifies Principal Emily Taylor and resurrects memories of times and places she would rather forget.  The school is closed for the summer.  But have the authorities played into the hands of a murderer?

Victim is the second novel.

The inexplicable disappearance of two well-known women, the resurrection of an ancient legend, and the violence linked to a disputed land claim, all combine to terrify and unnerve the villagers of sleepy Burchill.  School Principal Emily Taylor, while battling her own secret demons, must unravel both myth and truth before there is more bloodshed.

Legacy, the third in the series, dark memories from the past and long buried secrets surround seemingly unconnected families. As each individual searches for answers, they learn that it is only through community and love that they can overcome the ramifications of evil.

Seventh Fire reveals Emily and her husband’s dark past.

You can buy the books through links at www.imajinbooks.com or through Amazon.

If you would like to write a writing-related guest post for my blog then feel free to email me with an outline of what you would like to write about. If it’s writing-related then it’s highly likely I’d email back and say “yes please”.

The blog interviews return as normal tomorrow morning with speculative fiction author Danika Dinsmore – the three hundred and seventy-first of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum and you can follow me on Twitter, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,