Author Spotlight no.47 – Doug Simpson

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the forty-seventh, is of Doug Simpson.

Doug Simpson is a retired high school teacher who has turned his talents to writing. After many years of research and study he commenced his writing career by producing articles using the archived readings of the legendary American mystic, Edgar Cayce. Through 2011, he has published over twenty articles in magazines and on websites in Australia, Canada, France, India, the United Kingdom and the United States. He does not publish his articles on his website. Instead, he refers visitors to his site to the magazines and websites where the articles can be read.

And now from the author himself:

After writing articles for eighteen months, I was inspired to commence the creation of my first novel. My articles using the Edgar Cayce readings primarily involved reincarnation and past lifetimes so it made perfect sense to me that I should write a novel using my acquired knowledge about the discovery of past lifetimes and the survival of the soul after death, and that is precisely what I did. Soul Awakening is a spiritual mystery inspired by a series of actual events.

Thank you Doug. And more about Doug and his writing…

For an interesting adventure, check his website at http://dousimp.mnsi.net. His first novel, a spiritual mystery titled Soul Awakening, was published in the United States in October of 2011, by Book Locker. Check it out at http://booklocker.com/books/5754.html. It is available in print and eBook format through most bookstores around the world.

Soul Awakening is the story of three strangers, who are brought together by accident, or so it appears initially, but who ultimately discover that their unorthodox introductions were arranged by Divine Intervention. Dacque LaRose, the senior member of the trio, is the learned teacher who commenced an educational journey, ten years earlier, a month after the unfortunate passing of his wife, when her spirit appeared in their living room one evening with some inspirational advice for him. Already a casual believer in life after death of the body, Dacque eagerly researched the notion of survival of the soul and spirit after death, and his acquired knowledge led him to the possibility of reincarnation.
Dacque joined the snowbird migration, within a year of the death of his wife, and sold the family home in Ohio and landed in the south in the small retirees-dominated city of Anywhere. His research after his move to Anywhere introduced him to an area group called the Reincarnation Enlightenment Group, and he joined up. One of the founding members of the Group is a certified regression therapist who, as part of her research in the area of reincarnation, offers Group members past life regression sessions for free, in her spare time. Dacque requested three regression sessions and discovered ten of his previous incarnations, as well as learning that significant individuals in this lifetime had played primary roles in his earlier incarnations.
With Dacque’s elevated understanding of souls, spirits and life on ‘the other side’ there grew the realization that he was receiving communications from God, or more likely one of God’s messengers. It was messages from God that led him, in two separate incidents, to the younger members of the aforementioned trio of strangers. God first leads Dacque to befriend Dani Christian, an unemployed and depressed legal secretary who is not destitute but effectively alone in the city. Only days later, through a Divinely-orchestrated nose-dive into the sidewalk on his morning walk, Dacque is introduced to his rescuer, a Good Samaritan named Max Winston.
Over time, Dacque enlightens Dani and Max on his beliefs in the survival of the soul after death and reincarnation. Max and Dani obtain past-life regression sessions and they discover that their souls experienced a previous lifetime together that also included Dacque’s soul. Later Dani, Max and his parents uncover a series of earlier intertwined incarnations where they are descendants of their soul’s previous incarnations, and also discover some historical earlier incarnations that they never could have imagined.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with short story author and novelist Sarah England – the two hundred and forty-second of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me. You can read / download my eBooks from Smashwords.

Author Spotlight no.46 – Malcolm Welshman

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the forty-sixth, is of Malcolm Welshman.

Malcolm began writing when he first joined a small animal veterinary hospital in West Sussex as a young vet, and started to attend evening classes in creative writing.  The exploits at the hospital were the source of ‘Interesting Stories from a Vet’s Casebook’, a series of anecdotal tales that ran in ‘My Weekly’ for fifteen years.

He went on to write a couple of booklets on kittens and puppies while continuing to dabble in features, providing copy for a variety of magazines such as People’s Friend, Yours, Parrot Magazine and Cat World.

On retiring from practice, he decided to write a novel, the outline of which had lain dormant in his files for ten years. Conceived in December 2005, ‘Pets in Prospect’ was born six weeks later in January 2006. The second publisher he approached, Robert Hale, accepted the book and it was published in hardback, paperback, large print, audio, Czech and Japanese. The subsequent publicity saw him give over 24 radio interviews and more than 40 talks, including four Literary Festivals.

The book was reissued as ‘Pets in a Pickle’ in May 2011 by John Blake Publishers; and the ebook version reached number two on Kindle’s bestseller list in September where it remained for two weeks.

The sequel, ‘Pets on Parade’, is to be published 2nd April of this year and the third is currently being written.

He continues to write features with recent contributions to Somerset Live, Sussex Life and three for the Daily Mail.

And now from the author himself:

When I found myself hopping across the precinct of our local shopping centre dressed in a white rabbit costume complete with fluffy pink ears, I did wonder whether I’d taken my quest for publicity for my latest novel, ‘Pets in a Pickle’, too far. But it did get my picture in the local newspaper in conjunction with National Red Cross Week – the rabbit gear had been a way to get local press coverage while holding a raffle for copies of my book to raise some ‘bucks’ for the Charity.

When the novel was first published by Robert Hale, back in 2006, entitled ‘Pets in Prospect’, I sat back and waited for the phone to ring. Nothing.  I scanned through the preview list and noticed a copy of ‘Pets in Prospect’ had been sent to Celia Haddon, then a columnist on the Saturday Telegraph.  She wrote about pets.  There was an e-mail address for her. I e-mailed her, apologising for contacting her in this way but wondered whether there’d be any chance of her taking a quick glance at my book and if so, providing me with a quote. Bless her, she came back in two days to say she was loving the book and here was a quote I could use.

That quote I passed on to the publicist on the Monday. She re-released the press statement to include the quote – it mentioned James Herriot – and it secured me three local radio interviews within the week. The ball started to roll.

When John Blake wanted to republish my novel under a new title, ‘Pets in a Pickle’, I had a lead in of six months before the publishing date of May 2nd 2011.

Having learnt my lesson from the first launch, I realised such quotes as the one from Celia Haddon, are a wonderful way to hook interest from the media and potential buyers. So I decided to make a concentrated effort to secure some for ‘Pets in a Pickle’ and make sure they were put in the new edition.  I eventually ended up with some generous quotes including ones from Sir Terry Wogan and Richard Madeley and a truly delightful foreword from James Herriot’s son.

In addition, this time round, there has been Kindle. There was an article by Stephen Leather in Writing Magazine on how he sold 7,000 ebooks in one day by slashing the price to 99p. I was on the phone to my publisher immediately.  They slashed the price of mine to 99p and the Kindle rating went from 22,000 to number 2 within a month.

We’re going to do the same when ‘Pets on Parade’ comes out in April.

It’s been five years since the first book. I loved writing the sequel and feel it’s much more character-based but still with some funny scenes. I just hope those who liked the first book will enjoy this one as much.

I loved this, thank you Malcolm (especially as I’m a Red Cross volunteer). Stephen is actually going to be my 250th interviewee on 16th January. I’d heard the same thing, although more about debut authors pricing themselves cheaply so readers will take a ‘risk’ (which is why mine are priced $1.49 :)). It makes sense to me as the cost of making it is the same whether one person buys it or a thousand. Thank you again Malcolm, do come back in April and talk about ‘Pets on Parade’. 🙂

You can find more about Malcolm and his work via www.malcolmwelshman.co.uk and Amazon.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with Margaret Falcon – the two hundred and thirty-ninth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me. You can read / download my eBooks from Smashwords.

Author Spotlight no.45 – Mia Johansson

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the forty-fifth, is of Mia Johansson.

Mia Johansson is a civil engineer living in Sweden, author of the fiction novel “Unfinished discussion about God – The diary of a time traveller” expected to be published 2012, and a variety of short stories. She is an occasional photographer interested in the architecture of old and modern cities, street life, a good cup of coffee and jazz. I have recently joined Google+ (late to the party, I know) and Mia is already there; you can view her stunningly attractive albums here. You can read two of Mia’s short stories (which was/will be also podcasted) on the Flash Fiction Fridays page (‘On the Bridge’ and ‘The Jazz and the Blues‘).

And now from the author herself:

…how I became a writer?  Well…

I really don’t know… If I am a writer at all. I did write some pages, some thoughts. But does it make me a writer?

I never thought or wished or even dreamed to be a writer. It just happened.

One day, two years ago, I said to myself: “I will write a book” and the next day I started to write. I had an idea about what I wanted to write but I had no idea at all about how to write a book. Rules and stuff like that you know, about writing, not that I am that kind of person that follows the rules in general either.

I lost the text three times somewhere in the outer space, the virtual one, meaning my laptop so I had to remake the story three times. Or was it four? And I re-read it kind of “thousand” times each time becoming something else (lol! wonder how it will look in the end).  It took me two years to finish the material for the “Unfinished discussion about God – The diary of a time traveler”.

Almost the same time I finished the text for the book, the chance to take a writing class occurred so I took it.  And as in my book’s story, so even in reality, my reality, everything went the other way round.  How? Why? Maybe it’s time to re-read my story. Again!

And so I became a writer.

Thank you so much Mia, and I look forward to reading more of your writing. 🙂

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with novelist and short story author Kimberly Todd Wade – the two hundred and thirty-fifth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me. You can read / download my eBooks from Smashwords.

Author Spotlight no.44 – Tristram La Roche

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the forty-fourth, is of Tristram La Roche.

Tristram La Roche is a British-born gay author who writes about male-male relationships. As a child he was dragged from pillar to post across Europe due to his father’s work. As a result, Tris says, he lacks the feeling of belonging to any particular place and describes himself as European rather than British. He knows his way around ‘Old Europe’ better than England and has spent much of his adult life living in Italy and France, and travelling extensively in Spain, Switzerland, Germany, Austria and Greece.

Tris has worked in tourism, yacht charter and journalism, and at one point dabbled in politics. He is a keen supporter of GLBT rights and takes a lively interest in current affairs across the board. Tris draws on his own varied experiences when writing, and when he isn’t writing he can be found reading, watching films, listening to music, cooking, wandering around art galleries, swimming and, erm, travelling. He currently lives between London and the north of England with his partner of fourteen years, and has a grown-up son.

And now from the author himself:

Some say you are the product of your upbringing. I suppose you can twist things to fit that. I was always drawn to the arts but my father, a dour and domineering Yorkshireman, said such things were for poufs and Nancy boys. Well, Dad, hey – look what I turned out to be! He wanted me to be a Clerk of Works or a Chartered Surveyor. Me? On a building site? As if! Mind you, some of those builders…

Even so, I floundered around a lot before finally deciding to write professionally. Yes, I had done some freelance journalism for a bit but I mean writing fiction – being artistic and creative. My first work, a novella entitled On My Knees, was published in June 2011 and became an instant Kindle genre bestseller. It’s a coming out story and, yes, somewhat autobiographical. Being my first published work of fiction it taught me a great deal, especially about how readers see your work. Thankfully, the vast majority of reviews were terrific but the ones that did criticise tended to do so because the very elements I had put in there that were true, the reader said ‘Tsk – just as if!”

I followed with another novella – in fact so far all my works have been novellas because I like them, both from a writing and reading point of view – called Lorenzo il Magnifico. This draws on some of my experiences in Florence, a wonderful city which you must visit if you haven’t already. The title plays upon the historic Medici figure after whom a street in the city is named. My Lorenzo inherits an apartment in that very street and it is the setting for some man-on-man romance.

Fixed was published in September and is about a successful chap who loses everything, including his partner, in the financial crash of 2008. Mike ends up back in the Yorkshire countryside living in a rented dump where he bumps into an old school friend, Pete. Pete is a plumber with a knack for fixing the broken.

My final offering of 2011 was something rather different, an historical gay romance called The Hun and The General. I took the old barbarian, Attila the Hun, and made him fall in love with Livianus, a fictional Roman general. It’s a story of political intrigue, masculinity and tenderness that shows how the course of events can be changed by love. It became an instant bestseller on ARe. My stories are erotic in parts – can I say that? – though I try to avoid writing porn. However, they are definitely adult material, so don’t buy The Hun and The General for your kids’ history homework.

Right now I am writing the screenplay for The Hun and The General. I loved writing the story so much that I’m pretty sure my next book will be another historical work, but I am contemplating doing some time travel and writing a sci-fi set far into the future. Whatever I write, the main characters will be gay and there will always be a message of hope.

Morgen: As a short story writer, I love novellas and yes, Tris, absolutely you can say erotic parts. 🙂 Thank you. You can find more about Tristram and his work via… his website: http://tristramlaroche.com, Twitter, Facebook and his Amazon Author Page. And he came back on 7th January for a full interview which you can read here

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with Shelley Harris – the two hundred and thirty-second of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me. You can read / download my eBooks from Smashwords.

Author Spotlight no.43 – Joseph V Sultana

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the forty-third, is of medieval post-apocalyptic novelist, fellow Radio Litopianinterviewee (and friend :)) Joseph V Sultana.

Joseph V. Sultana was born to a Maltese father and Scottish mother and hails from London’s East End when it was not known as Canary Wharf. He is proud of his mixed roots and heritage, and has taken to writing as a cure for a midlife crisis that did not happen (yet).

His first novel, Three of a Kind, is the first in his planned Unsceptred Isle series and was published as an ebook by Book Sanctuary in June this year. It has so far received several five star reviews on Amazon and he claims to have once spotted someone reading it on London’s underground.

Whilst Three of a kind is not winning any records or out-selling too many others, you can hear the pride in him about his accomplishment of not just writing a book and getting it published but mainly that other people, complete strangers, have read it and enjoyed it.

Joseph is a straight-talking kind of a man whose cockney accent loses his sounding of ‘aitches’, but this “rough exterior” (his words :)) hides the warm and helpful chap he really is.

He openly admits of his love of helping people where he can and is often found twittering advice or telling about other people’s writing and that could be why book 2 will be later than his self-imposed deadline of December 2011.

Nowadays he is an erratic visitor to the Litopia website to join in with the chat and being somewhat of a maverick, he will often go off in a direction way off topic, but always in the hope to bring a smile to anyone’s face.

And now from the author himself:

I know it’s been said many times and by more important people than myself, but nonetheless, I have a dream. A dream where I am like Ian Fleming sitting in my summer retreat drinking a soft drink while tapping away at my worn keyboard on the latest in the Unsceptred Isle series. Alas that dream is no closer than me winning the lottery. I have however, made a start by writing and getting Unsceptred Isle – Three of a Kind published.

I am not a purist, nor am I traditional in my writing or my approach to the industry. And at times I have been accused of breaking the rules and therefore I am somehow not seen as published. My reply is, ‘Thankfully we all have opinions and I happy you are exercising that right.’ To which I ignore any further comments and continue bashing at the keyboard as a child would while playing the whack-a-mole machine at the seaside.

In recent years there has been a global technological revolution and with the advent of eBook readers I think it is really important to understand about what’s happening to the publishing world. In my eyes these little gizmos are causing the same stir as the printing press, the custody of the written word has fallen back to the people.

Formula writing, sales models and demographics are the babies being thrown out with the bath water and I don’t know if that is a good or bad thing. All I see though is writers springing up everywhere, all vying for a piece of the action, and all being published along the way.

People like Colin Barnes and his co-published Killing my Boss or Minnie Lahongrais and her novel Sinners ride are only two of the many amazing books I have recently read. Neither will likely win a Booker or Costa but the stories are well-crafted by unknown writers who may have never had this chance without eBooks.

The development of the eBook must come from the publishing world though, because we are like children let loose in a sweet shop. Rules need to be in place, guidance is to be given because it’s a real free-for-all out here.

We need ePublishers, eAgents, more online outlets in place for us to be organised, else chaff and wheat will remain unsorted. If it was not for eBooks, Amazon and Book Sanctuary (my ePublisher), I would be an unpublished author, but what I’d like to see is the whole industry adapt faster, the British Library and others acknowledging that eBooks will be accepted as legal deposit and finally that eBooks are sold for a reasonable price, much less than their printed counterpart.

I don’t believe eBooks are going to replace the paperback like CD replaced tape, but there are here to stay, and will compliment what for me is an exciting and vibrant industry.

But that is just my opinion.

And mine. Thank you Joe. Lovely to have you back. You can find more about Joseph and his writing via… his website (http://www.unsceptred-isle.com) and Twitter.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with novelist, playwright, short story author and blogger Stella Duffy – the two hundred and twenty-eighth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me. You can read / download my eBooks from Smashwords (Amazon to follow).

Author Spotlight no.42 – Catherine Astolfo

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the forty-second, is of mystery writer, poet, children’s author, scriptwriter and interviewee Catherine Astolfo.

Catherine Astolfo retired in 2002 after a very successful 34 years in education.

In addition to her career as an educator, Catherine is a qualified trainer for the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory. She spent many years speaking and leading workshops around Ontario, both in business and in education. Described by her colleagues as a “dynamic, fascinating speaker”, she continues to apply those skills to readings, workshops and presentations on writing. Check out the Speakers Bureau at www.crimewriterscanada.com for more information.

Catherine has always aspired to be a published writer.  She can recall writing fantasy stories for her classmates in Grade Three.  Her short stories and poems have been published in a number of small Canadian presses.  Between 2005 and 2010, Catherine published four books in the Emily Taylor Mystery Series through her own company, Sisbro & Co. Inc. (Moe Publications). In 2006, Catherine was given an Arts Award from the City of Brampton to honour the first novel. In 2009 and 2010, her short stories won the contest run by Canada’s biggest mystery conference, Bloody Words, second and first respectively.

In 2011, she signed a four-book contract with Imajin Books for the ebook versions of The Emily Taylor Mystery series.

Sisbro & Co. Inc. also launched the first issue of its new ezine, Scribes Digest, on November 1, 2011.

And now from the author herself:

Why I Write Mystery

The devil inspired me to write The Emily Taylor Mysteries. Not literally, I hope, but more in the sense that I am intrigued by evil people. I am attracted to the reasons behind their darkness. As an old song says, evil grows in the dark… or does it? I think truly wicked people walk among us, aliens with human faces. Their lack of empathy, twisted ideas, and desire to hurt absolutely make me want to dig around and find out why.

Instead of becoming a police officer or a detective (since I’m a physical coward), I became a mystery / crime writer. I look for evil everywhere and luckily, there is lots of it around. In the newspapers, on television, from word-of-mouth, and let’s not forget, urban legends.

My first Emily Taylor novel, The Bridgeman, began as a character sketch. On a drive through a little town in Ontario, I was stopped at a drawbridge, where I noticed the lockmaster going about his business in a very ordinary way, barely noticed, red-checkered jacket, plain face, every day, slow habits and movements. And I thought: what could this almost invisible person be hiding? What dark secrets might lie beneath the banality of his existence?

At the same time, my niece had acquired a job as a veterinarian’s assistant. Her tales of the puppy and kitten mills and their victims gave me an idea for the secret my ordinary bridgeman might suppress.

So began the Emily Taylor Mysteries. At first, Emily Taylor, the local school principal, was a vehicle for the bridgeman character sketch, and later, for Victim’s Premise (Book Two).  By Book Three, Legacy, Emily had asserted a strong voice of her own and had become more the centre of the series than the carrier.

In the last few months, I have happily been adapting Emily for the new world of eBooks. She loves our publisher, Imajin Books, and has been blossoming under their tutelage. Despite being media shy, she even appears in the trailers!

Thank you Catherine. 🙂 You can find more about Catherine and her work via her website, Scribes Digest, Katy Words blog, you can buy her books (please do :)) via Amazon.com and Smashwords, and Imajin Books’ You Tube page. You can also read my full interview with Catherine here.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with poet Cendrine Marrouat – the two hundred and twenty-fifth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me. You can read / download my eBooks at Smashwords (Amazon to follow).

Author Spotlight no.41 – Charmaine Gordon

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the forty-first, of romantic suspense (occasionally with a touch of paranormal or mystery) writer Charmaine Gordon.

Charmaine Gordon is the author of To Be Continued (romantic suspense); Starting Over (romantic suspense); Now What? (romantic suspense with a touch of paranormal); Reconstructing Charlie, (romantic suspense and a secret); and Haven (a novella with romance, suspense, and mystery). All of the books are published by Vanilla Heart Publishing, USA.

Charmaine likes to say she tap danced out of her mother at birth into a world of men where women were subservient, expected to be good daughters, wives and mothers. She didn’t blossom until marriage to her high school sweetie and she began life as an Air Force wife, where she had many children while writing sketches and performing for the Officer’s Club on Sunday nights. After Air Force days came to a close and civilian life began, more blossoming took place: raising children, becoming a partner in business with her husband, and performing in community theater. When her happy doubles life became single upon the sudden loss of her husband, she turned to New York City and worked on daytime drama, stage, and movies. This she calls “the sweet time”. While finishing the run of an Off-Broadway play, The Fourth Commandment, she had an idea for a story. When the play ended, she began to write.

And now from the author herself:

Looking back, I think my one-track mind begins like this: some people sleep walk. I sleep write. A story comes unbidden in the night. Beginning and end. In the morning I write. For instance, Reconstructing Charlie starts briefly in a small town in Minnesota, a state I know nothing about. I always write about mature women. Uh uh. Not this time. The girl I see in my sleep is fifteen, gutsy, strong, and fiercely loyal to her mother. I see a drunken father, trouble, the girl’s mother packing a suitcase and writing a letter to unknown relatives in Chicago on Lake Shore Drive. She tells the daughter to run for the last bus. I wake and think, Chicago, my hometown. Lake Shore Drive not too familiar, but there’s always the Internet for research.

Little did I know the next few months, as I held my head in despair over this girl, that I would almost give up. But no. That’s not my style. So I wrote at least a thousand words a day, every day, and when I typed The End, I cried.

To all writers, I encourage them to never give up. There is a solitary joy in writing. Do you have a story to tell? Lift the curtain of memories you hide behind and write.

Thank you, Morgen, for inviting me to share my thoughts today.

You’re very welcome Charmaine, thank you for sharing them. 🙂

You can find more about Charmaine and her work via… http://www.vanillaheartbooksandauthors.com/Charmaine_Gordon.html and her books are available from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Omnilit PDF, Kindle, Smashwords Multiformat.

      

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with short story author and blog tour co-ordinator Jaidis Shaw – the two hundred and twenty-first of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me. My eBooks are available at Smashwords.