‘Those Rosy Hours of Mazandaran’ book talk by Marion Grace Woolley

Marion & Morgen smallHello. On Thursday night I went to a talk by former local author Marion Grace Woolley at Northampton Writers Group, at the Quaker Meeting House, Northampton, England. Marion is very active on Facebook and Twitter and having self-published a short story collection, published novels with Green Sunset Books and Netherworld Books but most recently has landed a deal (and even an advance!) with publishers Ghostwoods Books.

Although various topics were covered, Marion primarily talked about her latest novel, a historical fantasy, Those Rosy Hours at Mazandaran.

Those Rosy HoursShe initially talked about the cover (you can read about how the cover came together here) and said that the top picture was taken from ‘To the End’ by Babak Fatholahi (the original of which you can see here) and the bottom was a masked conjurer which was inspired by Gaston Leroux’s La Fantome de l’Opera (Phantom of the Opera, which started as a serialisation as many novels did in the late nineteenth / early twentieth century). Within the novel is a reference to ‘rosy hours at Mazandaran’.

This inspired Marion to investigate the author, the life he lead and Mazandaran itself (an administrative area of Iran). Marion was delighted to not only learn that it was a real place but one of her many trips overseas, she actually flew over it, albeit overnight so she didn’t get to see anything.

wifeThe Rosy Hours at Mazandaran starts in Sari, Northern Iran, which used to be the capital of Iran before it officially moved to Tehran. Marion then gave us a whistle-stop tour Leroux’s history and talked about the story of the Phantom, Eric. Learning more about the, Naser al-Din Shan Qajar, Iranian shah’s life, wives, dominant mother (Malek Jahan Khaom) and quirks was really interesting (especially seeing photos of how the shah’s wives beauty routine… and yes, our lady on the right is one of his wives!). One of the members of the writers group commented about the moustaches and no one could understand why (and how) the women would grow them.

Threatening the shah was Siyyid Ali Muhammad Shirazi, nicknamed The Bab who was appalled at the shah’s opulent lifestyle while his people struggled with day-to-day living. The Bab grew a following (Babism, the Bahai Faith) and the shah didn’t like what was happening so had him executed which then escalated, leading to the deaths of 20,000 Babis.

Marion then read an extract from her novel, set around the Irani New Year, which takes place around the spring equinox.

When asked, Marion talked about how she got published and how pleased she is with her ‘fair trade’ publishers, Ghostwood Books. One thing Marion said that I didn’t know was that the Amazon charts are based on hour-by-hour (or thereabouts) sales rather than weekly, monthly etc. I said it was probably why there were so many authors who claimed to be bestsellers (perhaps in their genre). Marion then mentioned how pleased she was with the audiobook version of Those Rosy Hours and said that it had helped her pronounce some of the trickier words!

veilsalomeAs with many authors, Marion said that the best fiction isn’t real but could be real so the reader can research the real events if they wish. She said how hard it was being a non-Iranian non-Muslim author so had to do a lot of research as to how women lived in that era. At this point of the presentation, Marion shows us slides of the different types of women’s attire from the burka to an Aladdin-style seven veils-type dancer. Marion, as part of her research, reads academia and surfs the internet to ensure accuracy but says there will always be experts out there keen to pick holes in any errors there might be.

Marion was then asked if she plans her novels. Like me (and many other authors), she said that she doesn’t plan but gets an idea and runs with it. If she gets stuck, she moves on to later passages and returns later. I do the same, putting ‘more here’ and move on.

l2419I asked Marion whether she has received any feedback from Iranian readers and she said she hasn’t yet. So, if you’re from Iran, do buy her book (Amazon links below) and leave a review. When asked ‘what next?’, Marion said she is writing inspired by the Children of Lir, an Irish tragedy. Marion tells me that she was reading about King Lear in the research and that Lir / Lear is a linguistic thing. She said, “Lear and Lir are the same name, but Lir’s used as a possessive. So Lear walked down the street / Lir’s children. It would be awfully confusing, and Gregory’s translation uses Lir – so I do. There’s also Irish chocolates called Lir.” Interesting. Thanks, Marion.

After early November fireworks festivities, Marion’s next stop is Kendal library (I love brown Kendal mint cake, Marion!) before returning to African in the new year. Marion then talked about how she was involved in the publication of a Rwandan Sign Language dictionary (see bio below for further details) and after thanks from the writing group’s Deputy Chair, Mike Richards, we had a welcome tea break (with scrummy biscuits) before setting on our way home.

And now a little more about Marion…

Continue reading

Post-weekend Poetry 100: Frustration by Marion Grace Woolley

Welcome to Post-weekend Poetry and the one hundredth poem in this series. This week’s piece is by multi-genre author guest bloggerinterviewee and spotlightee Marion Grace Woolley.

Frustration

Scribbling Like A Teen
Fervent and frustrated
Pen slipping through my sweaty palm
First efforts all cremated

I bite my lip and mop my brow
I’ve lost my own campaign
There’s just no way of putting it
I frown and start again

My rhymes are cheap and childish
My haikus half as high
My sonnets non-existent
Limericks make me cry

All this verse and reason
Hides the naked truth
I fit words into order
Like pulling out a tooth

I try too hard, I squish them in
Make sure each one has an end-ing
Couplets, pairs, and courting verbs
Nouns, full stops, and drunken slurs

Each dot dot dot, each dash dash dash
Each exclamation, quote and hash
Each ampersand and glottal stop
Each semi-colon; there or not

My thoughts run dry, my tongue is tied
I hide the things I feel inside
Behind a wall of Gothic Script
Arial Wide and Arabic (Traditional)

I bash the keyboard left and right
Change pace at every stanza
Scream my rage into the screen
Slave to (awkward) pentameter

My gifts have all abandoned me
My talents all took flight
Once my fingers drew the sun
Now they beckon night.

Every time I try to pen
The thing I need to say
It withers on the papyrus
Ink muddies up like clay

Continue reading

Flash Fiction Friday 061: Carte Blanche by Marion Grace Woolley

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the sixty-first piece in this series. This week’s is a 922-worder by multi-genre author guest bloggerinterviewee and spotlightee Marion Grace Woolley, which won first place in the Swanezine Short Story Competition in December 2011. 🙂

Carte Blanche

We’re like the sea, you and I. Rolling to a thick, deep rhythm that only we can hear. That invincible river of truth running between two distant shores, the type of truth you can drown in. 

Some nights, that’s exactly what happens, dragged beneath the surface of my own consciousness. Pulled under by the crocodile teeth of my own lies, ready for that final death roll. I wake, sweat drenched and sour in my own scent. Afraid that I will never be able to rise again, back to the cool oxygen that my body craves.

That’s the thing about cravings. Some things you crave because, without them, your flesh would die. You need to breathe, to eat, to drink. But other things – you need them just as much, but, in needing them, you’re killing yourself.

You never understood that, did you? You never quite got it.

And now it’s too late. Every day of our lives I tried to explain it to you. Tried to show you; make you aware. At first I thought you hadn’t noticed – I really was that subtle. Pouring your champagne before mine. Helping you into your coat as we left the restaurant. Would I have noticed? Probably not.

But as time went by, I started to suspect. I knew you better than that, see. To me, you’re like crackle glass. There’s nothing transparent about you. If you were ordinary, I could look straight through you and know all there is to know. I could see our future on the other side of you. I could look you over, and look away.

But you’re not. Your clarity changes with the light. Those thick fractures within you, they fascinate the eye. I could gaze at you for a lifetime and never see the complete picture. It takes a complicated person to be that beautiful. It takes intelligence to break itself upon the jarred rocks of self-realisation and denial.

That’s how I knew that you were choosing not to acknowledge me. You were fully aware of my craving, yet you chose to overlook it. You chose to withdraw into the facetious playroom of childhood innocence. You chose to be stupid, blind and dumb.

And every part of me wanted you more for that.

I couldn’t help what happened that night. The fairy lights twinkled as bright as stars around the garden trellis. Your husband and his fat, porky guests quaffing port like pigs in a mud hole. Drunk on their own fine taste and sense of self-worth. I watched you smile, like a string of pearls strung around a pauper. That fake, false way that I watched you cultivate over twenty years of marriage.

I missed the girl in you. I missed the part that was real; that was genuine. Where did she go? Sometimes when we’d take tea, or walk in the country, I’d imagine that I caught a glimpse of her. For a moment she would return as if from some far-flung adventure to the outer shores of existence. ‘I was always coming home,’ she’d say, then just as soon be off on her next escapade, far beyond my grasp.

I loved you from the first moment I saw you, standing in your skinny gym slip at St. Mary of the Immaculate Heart’s. I cherished those all-girl dances we used to attend. They were our salad days. Where no man could touch you, because none were invited.

Every sentence begins with ‘I’, because I never knew what you thought or felt. Did you ever look at me sideways in the showers? Did you ever wonder? Did you ever, for one brief moment, in the dark-enraptured night, consider what it might have been like?

Each of your boyfriends came and went, so literally. Yet I was always constant. After every heartbreak, after every betrayal – wasn’t I always there, just as I ever was? Perhaps you believed my inventions, those imaginary boyfriends who never called and never sent me flowers. Surely you knew that there was only ever one. One person, out of the entire world, that had my full attention.

It had to be said. As we sat beneath the eaves of your grand affluence, staring out across the night-cooled lawns towards the lake. It had to be said.

The sting of your hand across my face burns still. That hot horror as you realised what I had been trying to tell you all our lives. And in that moment, as your eyes flashed and your pearls broke and scattered, I knew that you had known. I knew that, in your own way, you had expected this moment to come.

I suppose, if we’re now to be honest, I had always known your reaction. What caused me to provoke you, I cannot say. The empty look of your Gould-guzzling guests, your husband’s hollow laugh; the sheer plasticity of it all? The faintest recognition in the depths of my soul that there could be another life behind all of this. Something real. Something meaningful.

And now, there is nothing. Should I regret opening my mouth? Because I do, with every ounce of my being. If, by staying silent, I could look upon you every day for the rest of our lives – look, but never touch – I would sign my name to that contract. But it’s too late. That river of truth touches both our continents, but forever keeps us worlds apart.

Should you ever return to the country of our birth, you shall find me waiting. Here, beneath the eaves.

I asked Marion what prompted this piece and she said…

Carte Blanche was written specifically for the Swanezine Short Story Competition in December 2011. Incredibly, it beat 214 other entries to take the (cash) first prize. So, an afternoon well spent.

I’ve been a long-standing supporter of a scriptwriting community called Celtx. They used to run short competitions on their forum, based on prompts. Their 14th competition, in 2008, asked for a ‘script over 5 pages of a meeting between two formerly-close friends that haven’t seen one another for over a year.’

I titled my seven-page entry Meet Me Next June. It was set in a café where two formerly-close friends, June (ho ho) and Emily, were experiencing a less-than-comfortable reunion. Friends for years, they had fallen out when June finally confessed her feelings and tried to kiss Emily. It’s a theme that I had been holding onto for a while.

At the time of writing Carte Blanche, I had been enthused by the Muse. Every now and then – rarely – you meet someone who captures your imagination. It’s never a deliberate thing, but it has the effect of wiring you into the mains, rather than running off double As.

Possibly for that reason, this story was one of the easiest to write; it just flowed onto the page. I think I knew, when I got to the end, that I’d written something special. It’s a hefty thing to say, but I still class this as one of the best pieces I’ve written to date. See what you think.

It was great. Thank you, Marion.

Marion Grace Woolley is the author of four novels and a collection of short stories. In 2009, she was shortlisted for the Luke Bitmead Bursary for New Writers.

Balancing her creative impulses with a career in International Development, she has worked and travelled across Africa, Australia, Armenia, and a few other places beginning with ‘A’.

An associate member of the Society of Authors, Marion is currently at work on her fifth novel.

You can find out more about Marion and her writing from her website and see her book trailer on YouTube.

***

If you’d like to submit your 1,000-word max. stories for consideration for Flash Fiction Friday take a look here.

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with psychological thriller novelist Rebecca Reid – the five hundred and fifty-fourth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

** NEW!! You can now subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app!

See http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008E88JN0

or http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008E88JN0 for outside the UK **

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything. You can contact me and find me on the internetview my Books (including my debut novel!) and I also have a blog creation / maintenance service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are fortnightly episodes, usually released on Sundays, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Guest post: Intelligence – It’s How You Say It by Marion Grace Woolley

Tonight’s guest blog post, on the topic of pronunciation in writing, is brought to you by multi-genre author Marion Grace Woolley.

Intelligence – It’s How You Say It

I recently released my first collection of short stories: Splintered Door.

I approached it as a bit of a showcase. A chance to attempt ideas and styles that I’d not had the gumption to try before.

One thing I wanted to have a go at was writing an American story. Could I push my imagination, and my skill, to cross-continental levels? Although I’d never been to America, there are a lot of US influences growing up in Britain. I’d read several American novels, watched countless movies; I can even manage a passable Goodfellas impression. How hard could it be?

I was happy with my first draft of The Butterfly’s Predator. It’s about a young man who lives with his mother and his mentally-challenged sister. One day, whilst he’s supposed to be watching her, his sister disappears into the forest and uncovers a dark family secret.

‘Not bad,’ I thought. ‘But I need a second opinion.’

I have a few American friends, though what I required was an American who could also write. One who would understand what I was aiming for: authenticity.

I decided to post for help in a writing forum. The appeal was short and to the point: “I’m looking for someone to help convert a story from UK English to US English.”

The responses were less than encouraging:

“One word… Why?!”

“I agree… why? If you really must (???) run a Microsoft spell check.”

I was flabbergasted. Nobody seemed to understand why, whereas I didn’t understand why not.

Then came this statement, which summed up their aversion to conversion:

“Why rewrite it at all? It sounds so much more intelligent in British.”

So much more intelligent?

That stopped me in my tippety-tapping tracks.

I’m not actually going to argue this assertion. I studied Language & Communication Research at post-graduate level. I know a thing or two about the social perception of accents.

For instance, there have been studies in the UK which have shown direct correlations between a person’s dialect and how intelligent they are perceived as being. Generally speaking, people with Brummie (Birmingham) accents fare worst, being considered of lower IQ in job interviews and causing unease in over 70% of passengers surveyed on the topic of aeroplane announcements.

RP (received pronunciation) or ‘Queen’s English’ on the other hand, suggests an educated person of above-average intelligence.

Those with a northern accent, especially from Yorkshire, don’t always score highest on intelligence, but do tend to instil a sense of trustworthiness.  It’s a favoured accent on insurance sales lines.

Across the pond, those with a Southern accent are classed as America’s Brummies, scoring the lowest accent-to-IQ ratio in perception tests.

Another entertaining twist is the ‘post-vocalic R’. This is where an R comes after a vowel. In the UK, if you drop it, you also drop a lot of negative assumptions.

An Etonian may recite Blake’s poem: “Tiga, tiga, burning bright…”

Whereas someone from the West Country, with a long tradition of simple farming folk, might utter the verse: “Tigur, tigur, burnin’ brigh’…”

Conversely, in parts of the states, intelligence is placed vice versa, with an increased respect for individuals who include the post-VR. Similarly, in Singapore English, 76% of people in a study felt that those who use it are more intelligent than those who do not.

Essentially, there’s a whole world of assumption placed on pronunciation.

It’s far from a recent breakthrough. If you’ve read Lady Chatterley’s Lover, you’ll notice that Mellors affects a thick colloquial accent to disguise the fact that he was once a high-ranking officer in the army. Mellors (and through him, D. H. Lawrence) knew all too clearly the social perception of inflection.

That this carries over into writing isn’t new, either. I just hadn’t heard it put quite so bluntly before: that ‘realize’, ‘honor’ or ‘program’ are just down-right ‘unintelligent’.

What bothers me more, though, is the implication behind all of this. That the purpose of writing is to show how intelligent you, as a writer, are.

To me, that seems almost the antithesis of good storytelling. Character comes first and foremost. If every character talks like you do, and aspires to demonstrate your highest level of intelligence – aspires to be intelligent – what a boring play we perform.

The nature of intelligence itself has long been debated. There are several forms of IQ test, measuring a range of elements from academic ability to social intelligence.

As a writer, there’s a huge range of opportunity in counter-intelligence: characters who get to where they’re going through much-maligned ‘luck’ rather than by design. Or those, like Mellors, who speak with all the airs and graces of a pit pony, yet go on to astonish us with their cunning rationale.

At its core, the language your character chooses to use is a mask. No less important than the clothes they wear, the items they feel connected to, and the thoughts they express. Their idiolect is theirs and theirs alone. By giving them one – an accent, a speech pattern, a favoured hedger, even a lisp – you create depth. Not only depth, but the ability to be something other than what they appear at face value.

Language embodies the beautiful art of distraction, whether spoken or written. As a writer, cherish this. Use it to your advantage.

Don’t be afraid to create a character that seems a little under par. They can only turn out to surprise us, whereas a know-it-all is always a know-it-all.

Absolutely, characters with flaws are more realistic… perfection can easily become tiresome. Thank you, Marion!

Marion Grace Woolley is the author of four novels and a collection of short stories. In 2009, she was shortlisted for the Luke Bitmead Bursary for New Writers.

Balancing her creative impulses with a career in International Development, she has worked and travelled across Africa, Australia, Armenia, and a few other places beginning with ‘A’.

An associate member of the Society of Authors, Marion is currently at work on her fifth novel.

You can find out more about Marion and her writing from her website and see her book trailer on YouTube.

***

If you would like to write a writing-related guest post for my blog then feel free to email me with an outline of what you would like to write about. If it’s writing-related then it’s highly likely I’d email back and say “yes please”.

The blog interviews return as normal tomorrow morning with short story author Christopher Farley – the five hundred and twenty-third of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, bloggers, autobiographers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at Smashwords, Sony Reader Store, Barnes & Noble, iTunes Bookstore, Kobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum and you can follow me on Twitter, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.

Author Spotlight no.83 – Marion Grace Woolley

Complementing my daily blog interviews, today’s Author Spotlight, the eighty-third, is of Marion Grace Woolley.

Marion Grace Woolley studied at the British Record Industry Trust (BRIT) School of Performing Arts, Croydon. After obtaining an MA in Language & Communication Research from the University of Cardiff, she declared that she’d had enough of academia and decided to run away to Africa.

Balancing her creative impulses with a career in International Development, she worked and travelled across Africa, Australia, Armenia, and a few other places beginning with ‘A’. In 2009, Marion helped to oversee the publication of the first Dictionary of Amarenga y’Ikinyarwanda (Rwandan Sign Language). A project of which she was immensely proud to have been a part.

The same year, Marion was shortlisted for the Luke Bitmead Bursary for New Writers. She is the author of three novels and an associate member of the Society of Authors.

She now lives in Gloucester, having just taken on the role of managing the New Olympus Theatre.

And now from the author herself:

I think that I’ve always been a writer, in much the same way that I’ve always been female. It’s just something I am, rather than something I consciously set out to become. In that respect, I’ve been quite lucky. We tend to excel at the things we enjoy, and I enjoy writing immensely. Of course I have my off-days, and the occasional month of intellectual inertia – who doesn’t? But I always come back to the page. I think, in order to write good stories, you have to love stories themselves. Within every author is an inherent need to communicate: ideas, expressions, knowledge. A compelling need to get something across. To reach an ‘aha!’ moment of understanding with another person. Whether that person is reading you on a commuter train, whether they’re lying in bed or rowing single-handedly around the world. We reach out with our words and seed imaginings.

One of my favourite Latin phrases is: Pro captu lectoris habent sua fata libelli – which basically means ‘each book has its destiny according to the capability of its reader.’ I love that as a concept. That, as writers, we breathe life into something which goes on to fulfil its own destiny in the hands of the people who read it.

I also think that authors – especially of contemporary fiction – have to be pretty fearless. You have to be willing to ‘go there’. To speak from a place of questioning and observation. Big books require big ideas, which come from testing boundaries, travelling, seeing things, talking about them – an exhausting undertaking.

I’m not just talking about travelling in a geographical sense – though that is important. I also mean travelling within oneself. Great stories almost always include some element of love, conflict and death. A straight-road story from A-Z through B, C and D is dull. People read fiction in a similar way to peering through the proscenium arch of a theatre. They want to observe a human disaster, without having to live it. That’s how we learn. We watch things happening from a safe distance, allowing us to retain enough sense of self to analyse what is happening and plot our response.

I think that’s why I find it difficult to stick to one genre. Thanks to e-publishing and flourishing small press, I don’t have to. Fiction, for me, is a constant exploration of Self, even in its most sycophantic or indulgent form. To restrict myself to one genre or style would breed frustration down the line. It might not be the best marketing technique, but it’s best for me as a writer right now.

For aspiring writers, I’d go back to that quote. Remember that every book has a soul within it. Trust in that soul to shine through.

Then invest in an editor.

Now I know why my school best friend studied Latin. Thank you, Marion. You can find more about Marion and her writing via…
Her website: http://www.authormgw.co.uk
Angorichina Book Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOfH_BGLhAc
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marion-Grace-Woolley/215153611833763
Twitter: @AuthorMGW / https://twitter.com/#!/AuthorMGW

The blog interviews will return as normal tomorrow with author Susan Spence – the three hundred and sixty-fifth of my blog interviews with novelists, poets, short story authors, biographers, agents, publishers and more. A list of interviewees (blogged and scheduled) can be found here. If you like what you read, please do go and investigate further. And I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog; do either leave a comment on the relevant interview (the interviewees love to hear from you too!) and / or email me.

You can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything… and follow me on Twitter where each new posting is automatically announced. You can also read / download my eBooks and free eShorts at SmashwordsSony Reader StoreBarnes & NobleiTunes BookstoreKobo and Amazon, with more to follow. I have a new forum and you can follow me on Twitter, friend me on Facebook, like me on Facebook, connect with me on LinkedIn, find me on Tumblr, complete my website’s Contact me page or plain and simple, email me.  I also now have a new blog creation service especially for, but not limited to, writers.

Unfortunately, as I post an interview a day (amongst other things) I can’t review books but I have a feature called ‘Short Story Saturdays’ where I review stories of up to 2,500 words. Alternatively if you have a short story or self-contained novel extract / short chapter (ideally up to 1000 words) that you’d like critiqued and don’t mind me reading it / talking about and critiquing it (I send you the transcription afterwards so you can use the comments or ignore them) 🙂 on my ‘Bailey’s Writing Tips’ podcast, then do email me. They are weekly episodes, usually released Monday mornings UK time, interweaving the recordings between the red pen sessions with the hints & tips episodes. I am now also looking for flash fiction (<1000 words) for Flash Fiction Fridays and poetry for Post-weekend Poetry.