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Guest post: The Truth About Fiction by sff author Shirley Golden

Today’s guest blog post, on the topic of how believable our writing should be, is brought to you by sci-fi fantasy author Shirley Golden.

The Truth about Fiction

shirley-goldenThe first novel I ever wrote fell into the genre of historical fiction. I have to confess, it was driven by my characters and the excitement that I had embarked upon a book-length story. Later, I calmed down, and began to research, adding details and removing sections in a bid to make it more authentic. I worried it wasn’t “real” enough. But I needn’t have worried because after about fifty rejections from agents and a handful of publishers, it became clear that no one else was going to read it. Interestingly, an evaluation from a paid critique was more concerned that my protagonist was not likeable enough, rather than finding fault with the details of time and place.

As I continued to write, I read lots of advice about sticking to your preferred genre. I studied my book shelves. Yes, I certainly had a fair few historical fiction titles. But I loved the Otherworldly and fantasy in all of its forms, regardless of if it was set in the past, present or future. I experimented with other genres. I joined writers’ groups but became a little frustrated with the current trend of sticking to realism in fiction. Of course, I understand the need to suspend disbelief, and that in certain genres (e.g. mis lit, crime fiction) realism is expected. However, from my perspective, so long as I’m invested in psychologically believable characters, and the story has its own internal consistency, I’m prepared to stretch that disbelief far, far away.

When I embarked upon writing my novel, Skyjacked, a space fantasy, I began to research such things as how long it would take to travel to various planets, time-travel and teleportation. I realised my story fell beyond the parameters of what’s currently deemed theoretically possible.

I reminded myself that one of my favourite novels is set during the Napoleonic wars, the protagonist has webbed feet, can walk on water, and her heart is kept in a jar by an ex-lover. Not once during reading Jeanette Winterson’s, The Passion, did I question the credibility of these things. And why should I? I was reading fiction and loving it. Not that I’m comparing my work to hers, or indeed to any “literary” work. But I can’t help feeling that stories are often more fun when we’re prepared to loosen our hold on reality.

After watching the TV series, Sleepy Hollow, I went back to the original short story by Washington Irving. I remembered that some of the underlying themes related to veracity in storytelling. The narrator is unreliable, not privy to the defining moment of the piece, and some of what he relates cannot be known to him, unless one of the other characters told him or, horror of horrors, he made it up! In the postscript, one man says he doesn’t enjoy the story because he can’t believe it, and perhaps serves as a reminder that the joy of reading fiction can be lost if we become too critical.

I’d love to know what others think – do you prefer fiction that conforms to reality, or stories that leap into the fantastical?

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Thank you, Shirley. I think that as long as something is believable and doesn’t jar with the reader then anything goes. As Mark Twain is quoted as saying, “Truth is stranger than fiction” and there are often things that happen in real life that you couldn’t write about because no one would believe it… which is a real shame.

Shirley Golden spent ten years working in factories, where making up stories in her head saved her from terminal boredom. She returned to education in her late twenties, gained a degree in psychology, and worked in research for a few years before deciding to dedicate herself to writing fiction full time.

Many of her stories have found homes in the pages or websites of various magazines and anthologies; some have found their way on to competition long and short lists. She won the Exeter Writers Short Story Competition in 2013. She loves flash-fiction and is one of the editors for the FlashFlood Journal, created by Calum Kerr, to celebrate National Flash-Fiction Day.

She is door person and arbitrator to two wannabe tigers, and can sometimes be found on Twitter when she should be writing. She likes to bake jumbo chocolate and pecan cookies and goes for long bike rides to burn off the calories. You can find out more about Shirley from her website (http://www.shirleygolden.net/index.html) and her sci-fi/fantasy novel, Skyjacked, was published by Urbane Publications in May, 2016.

skyjackedcover1Separated from his son, only a galaxy stands between him and home …

The year is 2154, and Corvus Ranger, space pilot and captain of the Soliton, embarks on a penal run to Jupiter’s prison moon, Europa. It should be another routine drop, but a motley band of escaped convicts have other ideas. When Soliton is hijacked, Corvus is forced to set a new destination, one which is far from Earth and his son.

Unable to fight – or smooth talk – his way to freedom, Corvus finds himself tied to the plans of the escapees, including their leader Isidore and a gifted young boy who seems to possess strange abilities.

Desperate to return to Earth and the son he left behind, Corvus is thrown into the ultimate adventure, a star-strewn odyssey where the greatest enemy in the universe may very well be himself.

You can purchase Shirley’s book from…

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If you would like to write a writing-related guest post for my blog then feel free to email me with an outline of what you would like to write about. Guidelines on guest-blogs. There are other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

BREAKING NEWS!!!

hitman-sam-cover-front-smallI wrote a crime lad lit novella (48,000 words) called Hitman Sam in 2008 and over the years, edited it, left it to marinate, re-edited it, put it back, then finally this year (2016), I edited it again and sent it to my beta readers who were kind enough to give me their feedback which led to more alterations and finally, on November 2nd, it was published!

It is available for 99c / 99p (or the equivalent in your country) via http://mybook.to/HitmanSam (links to Amazon in your country) or directly via Amazon.co.ukAmazon.com etc. but before you rush over to purchase this quirky novella, do read on to find out more about it…

Blurb: Newly-redundant software designer Sam Simpson is looking for a new adventure – a cryptic advert in his local paper gives him that, and more. With two women vying for his affection, going behind their backs isn’t the smartest things he’s ever done.

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This follows on just a month after my crime mystery novella, After Jessica, was published. Yay! Details below…

after-jessica-cover-front-smallThe second book I wrote, back in 2009, was After Jessica, a crime mystery novella published in October 2016. You can download this novella for just 99c / 99p via http://mybook.to/AfterJessica (which links to the Amazon page in your country) or directly from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com etc.

Tagline: Wind up his late sister’s affairs, Simon gets more than he bargains for.

Blurb: Jessica is an ordinary girl who comes across extraordinary circumstances and pays for them with her life. As well as identifying her body, her brother Simon then has to wind up her affairs but gets more than he bargains for. Who is Alexis, and why are Veronica and Daniel searching for her? Why is there a roll of cash in Jessica’s house, and what’s the connection between Simon’s sister and Alexis?

 
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Posted by on December 4, 2016 in articles, ebooks, ideas, novels, tips, writing

 

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Guest post: Putting Words In Their Mouths – How I Write Dialogue by Kristen Bailey

Today’s guest blog post, on the topic of dialogue, is brought to you by novelist and short story author Kristen Bailey.

Putting Words In Their Mouths – How I Write Dialogue

kristenWhen I was little, I was always slightly in awe of the cinema. I was a child of the eighties, when films were always a big event and I spent many hours with my sister and brother watching films over and over again until the video tapes sometimes snapped. It didn’t stop there, we would re-enact them, and commit a vast repertoire of classic lines to memory. I would like to say I’ve matured a lot since then, but still now Sunday lunch will be spent with the three of us quoting entire scenes from films that no-one else has seen, to the despair of my parents who wonder where they went wrong raising us…

It’s why I often think I’m obsessed with dialogue when I write. It’s the part of writing I actually love the most as it gives my characters life and purpose. By rights, this means I should probably be a screenwriter but instead I write contemporary women’s fiction where dialogue always features heavily and which often has to have an acerbic comedy edge to it. Does this mean my work is brimming with one-liners and jokes? Not really, and especially when it comes to dialogue. Few people speak like stand-up comedians and I know immediately if I’ve forced a joke in my dialogue as it will feel unnatural on reading it aloud. A lot of comedy is actually in the delivery and the situation, but it’s also not always explicit. It can be observational or paired with the reaction of someone’s inner thoughts. An editor once gave me the good advice to limit the amount of swearing I used in dialogue too. Saying ‘f***’ a lot can be amusing but can be jarring to read in print. It’s far funnier to be inventive instead: consider the usual ‘f****** hell!’ and how a replacement like ‘mother of arsebiscuits!’ is more memorable yet equally as impactful.

In both my novels, Souper Mum and Second Helpings, I also gave myself the challenge of tackling a variety of dialects; Tommy McCoy is a Mockney TV chef, Jools’ husband, Matt is Scottish, his mother Italian, Cam is American and Remy, Luella’s husband is French. Why not just ensure all my characters are from South London? Well, where would be the fun in that! I think it’s a tribute to my background and line of work. I’ve always loved, listening to the way that people talk; the intonation, the rhythm, the dialect that sets any one speaker apart from another. I trained and worked as a teacher of English as a foreign language so have always been fine tuned into listening to people’s accents but it’s also something I grew up with having a Singaporean mother and Guyanese father. Of course, authenticity is key here, so when writing dialogue in dialect I always read it aloud. My husband knows this better than most as he often wanders into a darkened room confused as to why I’m doing bad impressions of Shrek…

Inspiration to write dialogue can come from different sources too. I am admittedly a bit nosy and a great eavesdropper, nothing gives me greater joy than being sat on a crowded train and being inspired by two drunk people having a conversation about nothing. Because sometimes conversations have no purpose, their credibility is in their normality. In Second Helpings especially, there are scenes between Matt and Jools littered with incomplete sentences and a conversational ‘shorthand’ that is often evident between couples who have lived with each other for so long that they implicitly know what the other is talking about. In these scenes, economy is key: the prose takes over but I annotate the action with periods of comfortable silence too.

However, I’m still a TV/film addict too. I believe some of the best writing today is on television, and hearing dialogue being read out, as it should, can give you such great clues into how people really speak. Orange is The New Black has some of the best one-liners I’ve ever heard, the dialogue is not only slick but the comedy comes with how quick they spew out those lines, one on top of the other. For comedy inspiration, I always go back to shows like New Girl, Sex and the City, Modern Family and anything by Graham Linehan.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 26, 2016 in articles, ebooks, novels, short stories, tips, writing

 

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