The 365 Day Writers’ Block Workbook debut tour day five

The final day and this time four very kind reviews (click on the hosts’ names to read the full reviews)…

“I am happy to tell you here’s a book that can help you out of your writer’s block… a very handy tool for all writers… worth your time and effort… 4.5 out of 5 stars for me” Rubina @rubinagomes

“It’s a small book but packs a lot in… the weekly tips were excellent… surprised myself by writing some really enjoyable pieces of flash fiction… it made me want to write more!… I have since bought my own copy.” Suze @suzecm

“This book is small but perfectly formed… the format works well for ease of reference… It did produce some fascinating ideas… a very useful and surprising exercise… the results may make me a little braver and more experimental… For a small volume, this definitely packs a punch.” Julie @book_problem

“Anyone suffering from writer’s block should give this a try… there is simply no excuse to not get started… I’d recommend this to any authors, aspiring writers or even book bloggers who need to get creative and loosen up before writing a review or blog post. ” @Sassy_Brit

You can purchase the book here.

Thank you so much everyone, especially Sarah @BOTBSPublicity for organising and Caroline @CazVinBooks (and others on Twitter!) for sharing.

The 365 Day Writers’ Block Workbook debut tour day four

Day four and three more lovely reviews (click on the hosts’ names to read the full reviews)…

“jam packed with ideas… weekly tips are on point and useful… this book can make a real difference… I’ll certainly make sure it’s by my side.” Mary @bethsy

“an invaluable workbook… definitely help me kick start my creative brain… an easy to follow format… a handy tool for every writer out there. Grab yourself a copy. You won’t regret it!” Debbie/JB @BrookCottageBks

“a great little book… works on so many levels… the beauty of the book is that you can use the structure or not… this book is a brilliant companion… Morgen has done a fabulous job…” Kerry @Cats_Herding

You can purchase the book here.

Thank you so much everyone, especially Sarah @BOTBSPublicity for organising and Caroline @CazVinBooks (and others on Twitter!) for sharing.

The 365 Day Writers’ Block Workbook debut tour day three

Day three and three more lovely reviews (click on the hosts’ names to read the full reviews)…

“definitely something to grab your attention… fabulous POV explanations… a whole host of invaluable tips… I really enjoy using tools like this… kick start your writing journey.” Sharon @sbairden

“a great book that really gives your creative spark a boost!… endless possibilities… really helped me get back into writing… a fab little book that every writer should have in their toolbox.”Lorna @ljwrites85

“a fabulous writing aid… the writing tips I found extremely useful… excellent for writers’ block but also useful for honing your skill, writing a piece of flash fiction or pushing yourself to write outside your comfort zone… now I need it in paperback.” Julie @julieryan18

You can purchase the book here.

Thank you so much everyone, especially Sarah @BOTBSPublicity for organising and Caroline @CazVinBooks (and others on Twitter!) for sharing.

The 365 Day Writers’ Block Workbook debut tour day two

Day two sees three more very kind reviews (click on the hosts’ names to read the full reviews)…

“a no-nonsense, self-starting guide… some great writing prompts… really enjoyed the tip of the week feature… brilliant tips that get you thinking… great for a writing group… really does fire up your writing mojo!” Kim @KimTheBookworm (on Twitter)

“another brilliant workbook… incredible variety… the prompts feel unique… a great aid to creative writing, to really ignite the imagination… brilliant.” Lesley @lelbudge

“this book intrigued me… this book gave me a way in and a lot of inspiration… easy to follow and understand and the layout was great… I have read a few of this author’s fiction books and this was just as good, she certainly knows how to write a book for the target audience… full of a lot of ideas… highly recommended” Donna @dmmaguire391

You can purchase the book here.

Thank you so much everyone, especially Sarah @BOTBSPublicity for organising and Caroline @CazVinBooks (and others on Twitter!) for sharing.

Writing a story from ‘consequences’ prompts

FACEBOOK background books smallHello everyone. I’ve just finished writing a piece of flash fiction from prompts given to me by some of my (sixteen) intermediate students and I thought you might like to read it, especially as I’ve been a bit rubbish recently at telling you what I’ve been up to (mostly getting my eBooks available as paperbacks!!).

 

I was hosting a session on structure last Monday and we ‘played’ the story outline game I do in most of my courses. Take a look at How to write a 28-word story for the details of a previous challenge. This time I had to write a 246-word story featuring Eric and Storm (or Eric Storm), in a conservatory with a russet lion, one of the characters was fearful and it had to be a romance. This took me about twenty minutes to write but fell short of the 246 words (by about fifty) so I added in some description and tweaked it to my satisfaction until it hit the word count. So, without further ado, here’s the story…
Eric looked from the garden to his son. “Why the Wizard of Oz?”

“I don’t know. Why not?”

“It’s not very Christmassy, not very…” Eric did ‘jazz hands’. “Nativity.”

Ben rolled his eyes. “It’s on TV every Christmas.”

“And you’re playing which part?”

Lion 897102Ben wiggled his tailed bottom. “Look at my costume, Dad.”

“The lion then. But that’s red.”

“Russet, Mum said.”

“A shade of red. Not really brown though, is it?”

Ben sighed. “Does it matter? It’s the only bit of material Mum had. I thought it looked really–”

“Alright then, but why have you chosen the name Storm?”

“Because it’s a storm that takes Dorothy to Oz, on the yellow brick road anyway.”

“I thought the lion was called… What was he called?”

Ben crossed his arms. “He’s just called the lion. That’s dumb. He needed a name so I’ve given him one. Storm. It’s also an X-Men–”

“Mmm. And he was… scared.”

Ben coughed and looked at the conservatory’s chequered flooring. “Yeah, that’ll be easy.”

“Why?”

Ben didn’t look up. “Because I’m good at scared.”

Eric leaned forward. “No, you’re not. You’re the bravest boy I know. Take that time when–”

“Daaad!”

“You are. What have you got to be scared about? You’re good at learning your lines and…”

“Lucy’s playing Dorothy.”

“Lucy?”

“Falkner. You met her dad, Andy, at last month’s barbecue. They’ve just moved to…”

“Oh yes. Really nice girl. Why are you…? Oh…” Eric giggled.

Ben blushed.

***

365 covers montageThere you have it. My 246-word story. If you’d like to have a go at writing something from a consequences sheet, let me know how you get on. If you’d like to write from some of my prompts, take a look at my home page for the weekday writing prompts (or click Today’s online writing groups’ poetry and story exercises: 20 May 2016 for yesterday’s)… or you could buy one or both of my Writer’s Block Workbooks, each containing over 1,000 prompts and weekly tips. I’m currently devising no.3 which will be sets of prompts (two characters, a location, an object, a trait, and a dilemma each day for a year!).