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Book review – Three marketing / publishing books by John Monyjok Maluth

Today’s book review of an author’s three self-publishing guides is brought to you by yours truly, Morgen Bailey. If you’d like your book reviewed or to send me a book review of another author’s book, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Being a writer and editor, I read and review books with both hats. If you’re a writer reading this review and found it useful, do let me know.

John Monyjok Maluth’s three self-publishing guides

The Marketing GuideThe Marketing Guide: The negative concept about the traditional book marketing is that, a certain company must publish your book. This concept is now past. It is not modern even though some authors are relying on this concept even today. Getting into public is the main issue. The quality of your book matters the most.

The Publisher’s Guide: With the help of today’s technology, you can do the impossible things yourself. You can write, edit, proofread, design, format, convert, publish and market your books online. Would you believe this to be true? Whether you believe it or not, it is happening daily. People are writing and publishing their own book daily. The book publishing concept is already changing from time to time.

The Author’s Guide: In the Author’s Guide, I have discussed about the writing concepts, types, history, and finally, the independent publishing in the modern world. Today, you cannot only write books, you can also publish your own online. It’s time to get started!

Review (of the eBooks)

I came across Kenyan John Monyjok Maluth’s three self-publishing guides while recommending Smashwords to an editing client.

I started with the marketing guide where the first half talked about where to self publish and the associated outlets available so not really marketing as such. Section 5 entitled social network book marketing was the most useful although talked about the mainstream sites of Facebook, Twitter, Google+ etc.

It was at 88% that we get marketing tips so up to then it felt more like the where to get books available guide.

There was a fair amount of repetition throughout the book and the message was to use social media, tell friends et cetera so, for me, sadly nothing new but a good refresher, especially when it came to utilising email contacts. I have never set up a newsletter and had started the process on mail chimp – which isn’t mentioned in John’s books – and must see that through.

John’s publishing guide is similar but – as you would expect – shows you how to self publish and skims over marketing.

I then went on to the author’s experience which does what it says on the tin; how John came to writing and self-publishing then talks again about how to market.

In all three books, he reiterates that we should write because we love it, not for the money, although both is ideal. I concur.

I did spot a couple of typing errors in the marketing guide: ‘tranditionally’ and ‘its’ marketing success’ (where they shouldn’t be an apostrophe after its – an easy mistake to make). And another easy mistake to make – in the publisher’s guide – is ‘both you and me will be paid $25’. Drop the ‘both you and’ and the rest doesn’t make sense so the best way to remember when you’re trying to decide whether to use ‘you and me’ or ‘you and I’.

For beginners they are excellent guide, especially as they are all given away free on Smashwords, and a useful reminder for more seasoned writers.

*

*** Breaking news! My online creative writing courses are currently just £1 or $1-2 each! ***

You can subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app via Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything (see right-hand vertical menu).

You can contact me and find me on the internet, view my books (including my debut novel The Serial Dater’s Shopping Listvarious short story collections and writer’s block workbooks) and If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating. Thank you.

Morgen Bailey Cover montage 2I now run online courses – details on Courses – and for anyone looking for an editor, do take a look at Editing and Critique.

If you would like to send me a book review of another author’s books or like your book reviewed (short stories, contemporary crime / women’s novels or writing guides), see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog. And I post writing exercises every weekday on four online writing groups.

 

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Book review – for readers and writers – no.141: Morgen Bailey reviews Bobo by Richard Schiver

Today’s book review of a single short story is brought to you by yours truly, Morgen Bailey. If you’d like your book reviewed or to send me a book review of another author’s book, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Being a writer and editor, I read and review books with both hats. If you’re a writer reading this review and found it useful, do let me know.

Bobo by Richard Schiver

Bobo by Richard SchiverSynopsis: Awakening to find herself the victim of a kidnapping, Sarah realizes just how alone she really is. The kidnapper believes her husband will pay handsomely for her safe return, but he doesn’t know about their coming divorce. Help arrives from an unlikely source as Sarah comes face to face with old memories she’s kept hidden even from herself.

This short story is available via http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bobo-Richard-Schiver-ebook/dp/B00727UILU and http://www.amazon.com/Bobo-Richard-Schiver-ebook/dp/B00727UILU.

Review

The first sentence is good: ‘The sound came to Sarah like a persistent pounding’, except that it is the first of a two-sentence first paragraph which should be one sentence, and this happens a few times. The following paragraph is then a little repetitive: ‘it became louder, growing in intensity’, although I liked ‘until it filled the emptiness around her’. We then go back in time to her childhood and realise that it was not a great time for her.

When the kidnapper talked about a $2 million ransom, I assumed that Roger, Sarah’s husband, was a highflying businessman, but there is only mention of his humanitarian work, which as far as I’m aware doesn’t pay very well and his profession is never explained, which is a shame.

Another great phrase was ‘The reply was accompanied by a dry chuckle that stirred the short hairs on the nape of her neck’, and poor puppy Ambrose (great name).

There is plenty of eeriness in this short story, as the cover and synopsis would imply, and the description of sounds was excellent.

There are quite a few typos, however, including Mrs Michaels having an’ after Michael (Michael’s) where it shouldn’t, a rogue e in ‘clothe’, and some missing punctuation and incorrectly placed punctuation, and required capitalisation in dialogue.

Conclusion

For many readers, this would be an uninterrupted enjoyable story but for some – myself included – it needed a sweep by an editor for a final polish, especially one who knows the rules of dialogue punctuation, and for that reason only, this story loses a point.

Rating: 4 out of 5

*

Based in Northamptonshire, England, Morgen Bailey (“Morgen with an E”) is a prolific blogger, podcaster, editor / critiquer, Chair of NWG (which runs the annual H.E. Bates Short Story Competition), Head Judge for the NLG Flash Fiction Competition and creative writing tutor for her local county council. She is also a freelance author of numerous ‘dark and light’ short stories, novels, articles, and very occasional dabbler of poetry. Like her, her blog, https://morgenbailey.wordpress.com, is consumed by all things literary. She is also active on Twitter, Facebook along with many others (listed on her blog’s Contact page). She also recently created five online writing groups and an interview-only blog.

Her debut novel is the chick lit eBook The Serial Dater’s Shopping List ($0.99 / £0.77) and she has six others (mostly crime) in the works. She also has eight collections of short stories available (also $0.99 / £0.77 each) – detailed on https://morgenbailey.wordpress.com/books-mine/short-stories.

She also helps other authors with an inexpensive freelance editing and critiquing service, and welcomes, and actively helps to promote, guest authors on her blog – see opportunities.

***

If you would like to send me a book review, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Related articles:

*** Breaking news! My online creative writing courses are currently just £1 or $1-2 each! ***

You can subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app via Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything (see right-hand vertical menu).

You can contact me and find me on the internet, view my books (including my debut novel The Serial Dater’s Shopping Listvarious short story collections and writer’s block workbooks) and If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating. Thank you.

Morgen Bailey Cover montage 2I now run online courses – details on Courses – and for anyone looking for an editor, do take a look at Editing and Critique.

If you would like to send me a book review of another author’s books or like your book reviewed (short stories, contemporary crime / women’s novels or writing guides), see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog. And I post writing exercises every weekday on four online writing groups.

 
 

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Book review – for readers and writers – no.140: Morgen Bailey reviews A Very Coco Christmas by Robert Bryndza

Today’s book review of a novella is brought to you by yours truly, Morgen Bailey. If you’d like your book reviewed or to send me a book review of another author’s book, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Be warned: I’m a tough crowd and the lead time for the former is several months. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Being a writer and editor, I read and review books with both hats. If you’re a writer reading this review and found it useful, do let me know.

A Very Coco Christmas by Robert Bryndza

A Very Coco ChristmasSynopsis: It’s 1985, and eighteen-year-old Coco is home in London for Christmas after her first term at Aberystwyth University. She has started to write, and fallen hopelessly in love with Daniel Pinchard, a devilishly handsome musician from the wrong side of the river. But Coco’s overbearing mother has other plans and resumes her campaign for Coco to meet and marry the ‘right sort of man’, preferably Kenneth, son of her best friends Adrian and Yvonne Rosebury, who will be joining them for Christmas. As snow falls softly over the city, and Coco tries to juggle a series of hilarious events, the stage is set for a Christmas lunch like no other. With a glorious cast of characters including Daniel’s mother Ethel, sister Meryl – and a turkey called Jean Paul Belmondo…

If you are new to the best selling Coco Pinchard series, fear not, A Very Coco Christmas can also be enjoyed as a stand-alone Christmas treat – and it has zero calories!

This story is available via http://www.amazon.co.uk/Very-Coco-Christmas-Pinchard-Book-ebook/dp/B00YVD3U40 and http://www.amazon.com/Very-Coco-Christmas-Pinchard-Book-ebook/dp/B00YVD3U40.

Review

I read the opening chapters of this novella while my other half watched a programme on bad 1970s TV and this felt very apt, albeit a decade apart.

Some of the writing was a little cringing, especially Dai’s reaction to Daniel trying to pay.

In the opening passages, I didn’t warm to the main character, Coco, and when she leaves her handbag on the train, I felt little sympathy for her. I do however when she goes home to visit her parents for Christmas, and an argument ensues. She is treated like a Victorian daughter – the story is set in 1985 rather than 1885. Her father is okay, albeit a bit of a pushover, but her mother is horrible and, for me, spoils the story. It felt like a new version of a Christmas Carol, perhaps this was intentional.

Daniel’s mother is just as horrible (and her accent grating*), and normally I would’ve stopped reading the story at that point but as it was a novella – and I was reading it for review – I continued. *The post-story author biography hints at English not being Robert’s native language which could explain this.

And now for writers…

– with the phrases ‘the sun began to shine’ and ‘Daniel started pulling down some mugs’, neither action is interrupted to so we don’t need either ‘began to’ or ‘started to’. There is also ‘the kettle began to whistle’ and although it is removed from the stove, we still don’t need the ‘began to’. A little later, we have ‘began to scream’, and further on, ‘Dad started to open the bottle…’ which could also go.

– there are twenty-seven ‘Well’s as pauses at the beginning of dialogue… far too many for such a short story and in previous reviews I’ve recommended only having one character say ‘well’ in their dialogue… or better still, chopping all of them. We say ‘well’ but we also say ‘erm’ etc. and don’t put them in our writing. ‘Well’ is useful to show a hesitant character but can – was we see here – easily be overdone.

– try to avoid character names that start with the same letter. Here we initially have Tanya and Tania and I was wondering why the author chose names so similar but it turns out that Tanya is Sara and Tania is Keren but no real explanation is given so it seemed pointless to me. It turns out that Coco is actually called Karen, so have those two names (Karen and Keren) in the same sentence would also be very confusing. As well as a Kenneth – too many Ks – there is also Daniel – the main character’s love interest – and the cafe owner called Dai. If Daniel’s name is shortened it becomes Dan… far too close-looking on the page to Dai.

– ‘A few days ago’ is present tense and should be ‘a few days before’. If you’re writing past tense, time frames should be set in the past e.g. ‘the day before’ instead of ‘yesterday’, ‘five minutes before’ rather than ‘five minutes ago’ etc.

– there is a line where the narrator refers to a girl with black lipstick and bright red hair in a huge spike three-feet high. Although it is clearly exaggerated, it made me stop and wonder, which is not a good thing as it pulled me (the reader) out of the story.

– I didn’t spot too many adverbs or clichés, although there was a ‘he worked his fingers to the bone’ is a classic cliché.

Conclusion

One of the few redeeming features was the turkey, John Paul Belmondo. The autobiography at the end of the story shows that Rob is a prolific author, with two Coco novels, which I hope are far better. The male characters in this novel were far better illustrated than the female characters, so perhaps the author being male is why and I wondered whether Rob’s editor – if he has one – is male too. I don’t feel inspired to read any other of Rob’s writing, which is a shame as it appears that writing is Rob’s full-time profession. The biography also says that he is involved in comedy and the scene with a turkey and Chris are funny but it not enough to redeem the story.

There were various points in the story where I wanted to quit but I kept going. By the time I got to the end of it, I wondered why. It’s not the worst story I’ve ever read, but it’s in the top ten. Looking (after writing this review) at this book’s scores on Amazon.co.uk, 55 people have given it a 5* and only 2 to give it a 1*. I’m a tough crowd and am in the latter category, therefore…

Rating: 1 out of 5

*

Based in Northamptonshire, England, Morgen Bailey (“Morgen with an E”) is a prolific blogger, podcaster, editor / critiquer, Chair of NWG (which runs the annual H.E. Bates Short Story Competition), Head Judge for the NLG Flash Fiction Competition and creative writing tutor for her local county council. She is also a freelance author of numerous ‘dark and light’ short stories, novels, articles, and very occasional dabbler of poetry. Like her, her blog, https://morgenbailey.wordpress.com, is consumed by all things literary. She is also active on Twitter, Facebook along with many others (listed on her blog’s Contact page). She also recently created five online writing groups and an interview-only blog.

Her debut novel is the chick lit eBook The Serial Dater’s Shopping List ($0.99 / £0.77) and she has six others (mostly crime) in the works. She also has eight collections of short stories available (also $0.99 / £0.77 each) – detailed on https://morgenbailey.wordpress.com/books-mine/short-stories.

She also helps other authors with an inexpensive freelance editing and critiquing service, and welcomes, and actively helps to promote, guest authors on her blog – see opportunities.

***

If you would like to send me a book review, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Related articles:

*** Breaking news! My online creative writing courses are currently just £1 or $1-2 each! ***

You can subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app via Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything (see right-hand vertical menu).

You can contact me and find me on the internet, view my books (including my debut novel The Serial Dater’s Shopping Listvarious short story collections and writer’s block workbooks) and If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating. Thank you.

Morgen Bailey Cover montage 2I now run online courses – details on Courses – and for anyone looking for an editor, do take a look at Editing and Critique.

If you would like to send me a book review of another author’s books or like your book reviewed (short stories, contemporary crime / women’s novels or writing guides), see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog. And I post writing exercises every weekday on four online writing groups.

 
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Posted by on December 27, 2015 in critique, ebooks, review, short stories, writing

 

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Book review – for readers and writers – no.139: Morgen Bailey reviews The Plane Trip by Roy Teel

Today’s book review of a single short story is brought to you by yours truly, Morgen Bailey. If you’d like your book reviewed or to send me a book review of another author’s book, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Being a writer and editor, I read and review books with both hats. If you’re a writer reading this review and found it useful, do let me know.

The Plane Trip by Roy A Teel Jnr

The Plane Trip coverSynopsis: As parents, who hasn’t taken their child on so many firsts? From the first car ride to the first day of school. There is nothing more precarious than taking your son on his first plane trip. This is the story of Jonathan. Dad is a frequent flyer; Mom so-so, and Jonathan… well… he has never been in a jetliner before. Only the imagination of a seven-year-old can turn a routine flight into a laugh out loud journey between the Fifth dimension and Hell, and somewhere in between, father and son bond in a most humorous way.

This short is available via http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00QWD2ZNY and http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00QWD2ZNY.

Review (of the eBook via the Kindle’s text-to-speech function)

Written in first person viewpoint, past tense, the story is just nineteen Kindle pages, so this is not going to be a long review.

The synopsis sums up the whole story well, and there really isn’t a lot more to add. The exchanges between father and son are amusing, and the father’s observations of his surroundings are well written.

Regular readers of these reviews will know that I have a bugbear for ‘well’ starting a sentence in dialogue. In this very short short story there are eight. It feels like every time the father speaks to his son, the father starts the sentence with ‘well’.  Perhaps it is something that the author uses himself because it is also in the synopsis!

There are also ‘began to’ and ‘started to’ where they are not needed, eg began to call seat numbers, the plane began to accelerate… where the action is actually happening (rather than being interrupted) so the ticket agent called seat numbers and the plane accelerated would be neater.

As the story is written in first person viewpoint, we are learning the facts as the main character learned them. However, he mentions that the air stewardess has come to offer him drinks, then a few moments later seems surprised that she has come to take his order.

Conclusion

It is an entertaining short short story. I downloaded it for free back in December 2014. It is currently (December 2015) $2 or £1.29 which I feel is far too expensive, even for a publisher published story (although the cover looks very amateurly made), and possibly why my review is the first given on Amazon.co.uk.

Rating: 2 out of 5

*

Based in Northamptonshire, England, Morgen Bailey (“Morgen with an E”) is a prolific blogger, podcaster, editor / critiquer, 2015 Head Judge for the annual H.E. Bates Short Story Competition, Head Judge for the NLG Flash Fiction Competition and creative writing tutor for her local county council. She is also a freelance author of numerous ‘dark and light’ short stories, novels, articles, and very occasional dabbler of poetry. Like her, her blog, https://morgenbailey.wordpress.com, is consumed by all things literary. She is also active on Twitter, Facebook along with many others (listed on her blog’s Contact page) and has created five online writing groups and an interview-only blog.

Her debut novel is the chick lit eBook The Serial Dater’s Shopping List ($0.99 / £0.77) and she has nine others (mostly crime) in the works. She also has eight collections of short stories available (also $0.99 / £0.77 each) – detailed on https://morgenbailey.wordpress.com/books-mine/short-stories.

She also helps other authors with an inexpensive freelance editing and critiquing service, and welcomes, and actively helps to promote, guest authors on her blog – see opportunities.

***

If you would like to send me a book review, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Related articles:

*** Breaking news! My online creative writing courses are currently just £1 or $1-2 each! ***

You can subscribe to this blog on your Kindle / Kindle app via Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can sign up to receive these blog posts daily or weekly so you don’t miss anything (see right-hand vertical menu).

You can contact me and find me on the internet, view my books (including my debut novel The Serial Dater’s Shopping Listvarious short story collections and writer’s block workbooks) and If you like this blog, you can help me keep it running by donating. Thank you.

Morgen Bailey Cover montage 2I now run online courses – details on Courses – and for anyone looking for an editor, do take a look at Editing and Critique.

If you would like to send me a book review of another author’s books or like your book reviewed (short stories, contemporary crime / women’s novels or writing guides), see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog. And I post writing exercises every weekday on four online writing groups.

 
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Posted by on December 16, 2015 in critique, ebooks, short stories, writing

 

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Book review – for readers and writers – no.138: Morgen Bailey reviews Diamond Run by Michael Croucher

Today’s book review of a crime novel is brought to you by yours truly, Morgen Bailey. If you’d like your book reviewed or to send me a book review of another author’s book, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Being a writer and editor, I read and review books with both hats. If you’re a writer reading this review and found it useful, do let me know.

Diamond Run by Michael Croucher

138 Diamond Run coverSynopsis: A story of underworld diamond heists gone wild, this is a terrifying spin through the ruthlessness of organized crime and the fright of a woman who finds herself the quarry. From New York City to Ontario, Canada, criminals and police are in a deadly race.

Caught unaware in their web, Sue Jensen is on her own chilling trail. Her beautiful Victorian house in the Canadian wine country is haunted. Since research is her business, she wants to find out who is the ghost slipping into bed with her at night. Will she discover far more than she ever imagined? Is it possible to put ghosts to rest?

Sergeant Phil Mahood, in a desperate undercover battle against the psychotic mobster-killer who will stop at nothing for diamonds, can only drop vague hints to Sue about the looming danger. Skeptical of her ghost stories and falling in love with her, he is torn as never before.

As the two investigations are about to collide, can Phil be the support Sue needs in her personal quest for the deep secrets of her home? Can he rescue her from the cold-blooded killer who stops at nothing and no one? With his world shaken to the core by Sue’s fear of ghostly presences he does not believe in, and his new love with Sue clouding his professional judgment, will Phil’s mobster targets stay steady in the crosshairs? This is crime suspense at its best.

This novel is available via http://www.amazon.co.uk/Diamond-Run-Phil-Mahood-Book-ebook/dp/B012EKPYIQ and http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Run-Phil-Mahood-Book-ebook/dp/B012EKPYIQ.

Review (of the eBook’s text-to-speech function)

The chapters are subtitled with the place and date, helping the reader before the narration starts.

Just five Kindle pages in to chapter 1, and we have two dead bodies – my kind of story. :-)

The character names are interesting, my favourites being Zip, Clifford, Lemon and Jasper, although I would not have had Frank and Phil in the same chapter as audibly, they both start with an F.

One of the characters is a staff sergeant and he is referred to as ‘Staff’ then in the same chapter ‘staff’ is referred to as a noun, which would be less confusing if referred to ‘colleagues’.

The era and procedures felt very authentic, I enjoyed the reference to candid camera.

Both the description and dialogue are very gritty. Some of the dialogue between Sue and Phil initially felt a little stilted but it transpired that they had not dated for very long and their meeting was complicated so understandable.

Chapters are relatively short so can be done in one sitting and there is a good mixture of description and dialogue.

There was one sentence that jarred: ‘I left it there as we walked, enjoying the soft warmth of her skin.’ This implies that they are both enjoying a self month of her skin, which is possible, but I think the author meant just for Phil to be enjoying it.

Speaking of enjoying it, there is a lot to like about this novel, including the phrase ‘A parked car sticks out like a hooker’ and ‘clung to his blubbery torso like a coat of paint’.

I didn’t find the sexy chapters particularly sexy but then I’m not a big romance reader. I’m not a fan of paranormal either so the ‘ghostly’ references were my least favourite but fans of this genre would enjoy them.

And now for writers…

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Posted by on December 9, 2015 in writing

 

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Book review – for readers and writers – no.137: Morgen Bailey reviews Trouble on the Heath by Terry Jones

Today’s book review of a crime novella is brought to you by yours truly, Morgen Bailey. If you’d like your book reviewed or to send me a book review of another author’s book, see book-reviews for the guidelines. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Being a writer and editor, I read and review books with both hats. If you’re a writer reading this review and found it useful, do let me know.

Trouble on the Heath by Terry Jones

Trouble on the HeathSynopsis: A comedy of Russian gangsters, town planners and a dog called Nigel. Malcolm Thomas is not happy. A view he loves is about to be blocked by an ugly building. He decides to take action and organises a protest. Then things go badly wrong and Malcolm finds himself running for his life. Along the way, he gets mixed up with depressed town planners, violent gangsters, and a kidnapped concert pianist. Malcolm starts to wonder if objecting to the building was such a good idea when he finds himself upside down with a gun in his mouth.

This novella is available via http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B008HHYN9W.

Review of the paperback:

A mere 104 pages, it is designed for “an avid reader who wants a quick fix or if you haven’t picked up a book since school”. This author is Terry Jones from Monty Python, and given the synopsis it is bound to be funny (He had me at a dog called Nigel).

– After Malcolm spots the planning notice, he calls an emergency meeting, which is hilarious.

– It is a very English story, especially with named characters such as Trevor and Cynthia. Lady Chesney is superbly portrayed and I love her view of Malcolm and his cheap suit and Liverpool accent, struggling to believe that he is a professor.

– We then meet the brilliant Russian, the evil Emperor, here miss understand the intentions of the residents association and plots – from his eye and fortress (very pretty 19th century house) to bring it down.

Thereafter comes a proliferation of peaks and troughs to form a true comedy of errors.

And now for writers…

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Book review – for readers and writers – no.136: House of Justice by Vincent Bivona

Today’s book review of a horror short story is brought to you by yours truly, Morgen Bailey. If you’d like your book reviewed or to send me a book review of another author’s book, see book-reviews for the guidelines. I am booked up months in advance though. Other options listed on opportunities-on-this-blog.

Being a writer and editor, I read and review books with both hats. If you’re a writer reading this review and found it useful, do let me know. If you would like help with your writing, do take a look at my online creative writing courses are currently half price.

House of Justice by Vincent Bivona

House of JusticeHalloween only comes around once a year, and the Justices do it right.

They turn their house into a museum of torture, sectioning off each room with a velvet rope.

The exhibits are so terrifying that the local amusement park asks them for their secret.

It’s quite simple, actually. And four lucky–or unlucky–fans get to find out what it is first hand.

Review (of the eBook using Mrs Kindle’s text-to-speech function)

Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 31, 2015 in ebooks, review, short stories, writing

 

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